среда, 22 января 2020 г.

'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki


The colonization of the northern Aegean by settlers from the Cyclades, soon before the mid-7th cent. BC, is one of the many fascinating chapters of the Archaic Greek colonization.

'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki

The new temporary exhibition of the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki offers through 478 artifacts a unique journey to the past. By sailing the sea routes through which the colonists travelled from the South to the North, the visitor has the opportunity to discover:

- What motivated islanders from the Cyclades to found colonies at strategic points in the northern Aegean?

- What were the relations between the locals and the colonists?


- Which were the peculiar and which were the common characteristics of the metropolises and their colonies?

- What kind of products travelled from and towards the new colonial markets?

- What impact the colonies had on the political, economical and cultural life of the regions they were founded?

'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Inscribed capital, Paros, 525-500 BC [Credit: © Hellenic 
Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Marble head of god Helios, Sani, late 4th-early 3rd c. BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Torso of a kouros Sanctuary of Apollo, Despotiko, Paros, 575-550 BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Marble disc with inscription in a Cycladic alphabet Akanthos, late 6th – early 5th cent. BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Necklace with the gold amulets from a child’s burial, Akanthos, 4th c. BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
Τhe installation is hosted in two interconnected halls of the Museum:

The first one is dedicated to the metropolis Andros, which, in collaboration with the Chalkidians, founded colonies in the eastern Chalkidike and the Strymonic Golf. The exhibition continues with its four ‘daughters’, Akanthos, Sani on the Akte, Stageira and Argilos.


At the second hall, the metropolis Paros and its colony Thasos as well as three of Thasos’ colonies on the opposite coast, Neapolis, Oisyme and Galepsos, are presented.

Mythological references, literary and epigraphic testimonies, historical and archaeological data but also intriguing results of anthropological and archaeobotanical studies contribute to the presentation of these cities.

'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Krater shaped skyphos, Zagora, Andros, 925-850 BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Amphora with painted decoration Paroikia cemetary, Paros, late 8th c. BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Klazomenean amphora, Akanthos, 550-525 BC 
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Cycladic plate depicting Bellerophon and Chimera, Artemisio, Thasos, Mid-7th c. BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]
'From South to North: Cycladic Colonies in the Northern Aegean' at the Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki
Incised representation of a ship on the handle of a column krater, Argilos, 580-560 BC
[Credit: © Hellenic Ministry of Culture & Sports]


Personalities, such as Archilochos the Parian and Aristotle the Stagirite come to life at the curatorial narratives, whereas the past meets the present through stories about erotic jealousy, unfortunate or premature deaths, valuable charms against evil, cookery and delicate surgical operations.

Children will find at the exhibition three spots especially designed for them. Prepis, a cute small monkey inspired from a clay figurine of the exhibition, guides the young visitors, teaches them how to write in the colonists’ alphabet, proposes to them ancient cooking recipes and trains them in the pentathlon.

The exhibition opened to the public on 12 July 2019 and runs to 31 August 2020. Throughout its duration, educational programmes and guided tours will be held.

Source: Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki [October 20, 2019]



* This article was originally published here

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