вторник, 31 декабря 2019 г.

Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru


Eleven graves containing skeletons of the mysterious Moche civilisation have been found in darkest Peru from 1,000 years ago.

Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Credit: CEN/Ministerio Cultura Peru
Two children buried at the site had symbols on their skull, from either tattoos or markings that got under the skin and blemished the bone underneath.


One person was buried with a sceptre and another was placed in a roofed chamber - indicating both were of high social standing and may have been priests. The graves also reveal that the majority of the skeletons had their feet removed.

Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Credit: CEN/Ministerio Cultura Peru


Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Credit: CEN/Ministerio Cultura Peru
Project director Edgar Bracamonte, from the National University of Trujillo in Peru, said: 'It is unclear whether they were mutilated, we will carry out tests but it is clear that their feet were not there when they were buried.'   


The researchers are also still trying to find out who the remains belonged to. The discovery took place at the Huaca Santa Rosa de Pucala archaeological site in the district of Pucala in the north-western Peruvian region of Chiclayo.

The region is considered a ceremonial hub for the region and it is believed the person buried in the large chamber could have been a religious leader. Mr Bracamonte said: 'We are trying to establish whether he was a priest.'

Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Credit: CEN/Ministerio Cultura Peru


Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Eleven skeletons found in 1,000-year-old Moche grave in Peru
Credit: CEN/Ministerio Cultura Peru
Ceramic and porcelain objects were also found at the site, and scientists hope the discoveries will shed more light on the people who lived there.


The site is several miles from Huaca Rajada, also known as Sipan, a Moche archaeological site that is famous for the tomb of Lord of Sipan. The city of Sipan dates back to 50 to 700 AD, the same time as the Moche Period.

Researchers on the project also discovered a temple that belonged to the Wari culture who flourished in the south-central Andes and coastal area of modern-day Peru from about 500 to 1000 AD.


It is believed the temple was build between 800 and 850 AD and will hopefully answer questions about the pre-Hispanic cultures in the region at that time.

In the temple's cemetery, experts found camel bones, carved objects, bottles and metal items that may have been used as offerings.

Author: Joe Pinkstone | Source: Daily Mail [December 20, 2019]



* This article was originally published here

How Much More Until People Start to See!

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Channel: Terry's Theories  

So many strange things going on in our world. I will Try to bring them to you one video at a time.

Video length: 11:39
Category: Science & Technology
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Archaeologists unearth possible evidence of early Neolithic farming communities in Dartmoor


New evidence potentially left by Dartmoor’s earliest farming communities 5,500 years ago has been uncovered by archaeologists at two of the moor's most enigmatic sites.

Archaeologists unearth possible evidence of early Neolithic farming communities in Dartmoor
Credit: Dartmoor National Park Authority
A series of previously unknown features including postholes and circular structures have been discovered at the tor enclosure sites of White Tor and Dewerstone.

One of the most exciting discoveries at Dewerstone (pictured) is the recovery of charcoal suitable for radiocarbon dating. Results are awaited but, if proved, could conclusively show people occupied these sites in the early Neolithic period - around 3,500BC.

Archaeological survivals from such early periods of the human past are rare and their presence on these sites, just inches below the surface, is a demonstration of Dartmoor’s archaeological importance.


The work was carried out as part of the Dartmoor Tor Enclosure Survey project, a collaborative effort between the University of Leicester and Dartmoor National Park Authority and funded by the Royal Society of Antiquaries.

Dr Laura Basell, Associate Professor of Archaeology at the University of Leicester and Project Director, said: “Even though sites we're looking at could be amongst the oldest prehistoric built structures that still exist on the moor, we know very little about them.

“We’re only in the early stages of the project but already the results suggest these monuments are a lot more complex than we previously thought. It’s been great to collaborate with Dartmoor National Park Authority, landowners and managers to improve our understanding of these fascinating sites.”


Project Co-Director and Dartmoor National Park Authority Archaeologist Dr Lee Bray said: “White Tor and Dewerstone offer an invaluable opportunity for us to shed light on the lives and beliefs of Dartmoor’s earliest farming communities and improve our understanding of how they saw the world around them.

"This has huge significance, not only for Dartmoor’s archaeology but for the study of prehistory in the South West and Britain more widely.”

The fieldwork was carried out using high-specification survey methods and limited excavation to improve understanding of the tor enclosures’ precise age and broader prehistoric landscape context.

Both Dewerstone, near Shaugh Prior, and White Tor, above Peter Tavy, have long been recognised as potential sites of Neolithic activity. Some excavations were carried out in the 19th century at White Tor by the Dartmoor Exploration Committee who reported finding Neolithic stone tools, pottery and charcoal. Sadly, the finds have been lost.

Source: Exeter Daily [December 23, 2019]



* This article was originally published here

Mysterious black object hovering above the sun

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Channel: Terry's Theories  

please help me with my research by donating at https://www.paypal.me/Franklin1275?locale.x=en_US

Mysterious black planet size object hovering atop the sun's just outside of the photosphere.The object sways side to side just above the sun what is this object, is it a planet that we don't know of is it some kind of probe.Surley NASA knows of this object.Take a look tell me what you think.If you can spare a little donations are accepted https://www.paypal.com/paypalme2/Franklin1275?locale.x=en_US

please help me with my research by donating at https://www.paypal.me/Franklin1275?locale.x=en_US

Video length: 6:44
Category: Science & Technology
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Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap


Fragments of pre-Aztec murals recently unearthed on the outskirts of what was once the largest city of the Americas are adding to mounting evidence that even commoners there enjoyed the finer things in life.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
Mural fragments depicting a bird, recently discovered in the Tlajinga neighbourhood of the ancient city of Teotihuacan
[Credit: David Carballo/Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
Each year, millions of tourists visit the towering pyramids and temples of the sprawling metropolis of Teotihuacan, far from the latest discoveries on the city’s southern edge.


“We’re now finding that life on the periphery was pretty good,” said Boston University archaeologist David Carballo, who discovered brightly-coloured paintings over fine stucco on three buildings he began excavating there in July.

Decorated with flowers and birds that appear to be singing, the murals evoking a paradise found nearly three kilometers (2 miles) from Teotihuacan’s core came as a complete surprise, he said.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
Mural fragments depicting a bird, recently discovered in the Tlajinga neighborhood of the ancient city of Teotihuacan
[Credit: David Carballo/Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
Carballo and his team have also found other signs of wealth nearby, including jade, a finely carved stone mask, and shells from Mexico’s Pacific and Gulf coasts.

The unpublished mural discoveries point to the radically different path charted by Teotihuacan, which thrived from about 100 B.C. to 550 A.D., compared to other ancient civilizations.

At a time when daily life in the biggest contemporary Mayan cities, or ancient Rome and Egypt, was marked by a tiny elite lording over impoverished or enslaved masses, most of Teotihuacan’s estimated 100,000 inhabitants fared far better.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
The remains of murals are seen at La Ventilla, one of the most extensively excavated neighbourhoods in the ancient
 city of Teotihuacan [Credit: David Carballo/Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT)via Reuters]
Archaeologists posit that a thriving craft-based economy populated by lapidaries, potters, garment makers and especially obsidian workers making razor-sharp blades made the city rich.


Near where the murals were found in Teotihuacan’s Tlajinga district, Carballo and his colleagues also excavated what would have been a bustling obsidian workshop that likely produced an estimated 200,000 blades during its lifespan.

In the city’s La Ventilla district, another aspect of Teotihuacan’s egalitarian character comes into view: stone, multi-family apartment compounds where over 90% of Teotihuacanos lived.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
A fragmented mural depicting a jaguar is seen on the walls at La Ventilla [Credit: David Carballo/
Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
Off limits to tourists despite extremely rare glyphs painted on a plaza, the narrow streets of La Ventilla’s residential compounds suggest a densely-packed urban existence.

The compounds boast white lime-plaster floors, built-in drainage systems, open-air courtyards and murals.

Lying 48 km northeast of Mexico City, Teotihuacan has more than 2,000 such compounds, thanks to a century-long building boom that ended around 350 AD.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
Archaeologist Ruben Cabrera points at the remains of mural paintings on the wlls of the Patio of the Jaguars
at La Ventilla [Credit: David Carballo/Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
According to Ruben Cabrera, a veteran archaeologist who pioneered excavation of La Ventilla, Teotihuacan’s mass housing is unprecedented in antiquity, pointing to lower inequality.


“It wasn’t as pronounced as, say, Rome or other places where there was a dominant group and a dominated group,” he said.

No evidence of slavery has been found there in more than a century of excavations, he noted.

City of Migrants

Arizona State University archaeologist Michael Smith, who leads a research lab at Teotihuacan, previously calculated a measure of wealth for the city based on its house sizes.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
A mural depicting a heart and a sacrificial knife is pictured at the walls of the Plaza of the Chalchihuites
at La Ventilla [Credit: David Carballo/Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
On a scale where 1.0 means one household owns everything and zero indicates total equality, Teotihuacan’s so-called Gini score came in at 0.12, which Smith described as a stunningly low level of inequality for a pre-industrial society.

“My first reaction was: ‘This is a mistake,’” he said.

Smith, the author of the book “Ten Thousand Years of Inequality,” plans to recalculate the score using a larger data set. While expecting it to rise somewhat, he says it will probably still be far lower than scores for Roman Pompeii or Egyptian Kahun.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
Archaeologists work at a residential compound in the Tlajinga neighbourhood of the ancient city of Teotihuacan
[Credit: David Carballo/Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
Smith also draws comparisons to digs at Aztec sites founded more than a millennium after Teotihuacan’s collapse.


The average Teotihuacan household had around 200 square meters (2,153 square feet) of living space, roughly the size of a tennis court, while typical Aztec dwellings measured about 25 square meters.

Burial data compiled by Carballo shows that Teotihuacan’s commoners grew to a height similar to elites, with males buried in apartment compounds less than 1 centimeter (0.4 inch) shorter than those interred near the city’s central Moon Pyramid.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
Men work at one of the multi-family apartments at La Ventilla [Credit: David Carballo/
Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
By contrast, commoners were over 6 cm shorter than royals in Mycenae, Greece, and 9 cm shorter in dynastic Egypt, the data showed.

Linda Manzanilla, an archaeologist at Mexico’s National Autonomous University, says the multi-ethnic migrant communities that settled Teotihuacan after two major volcanic eruptions likely needed more communal governance and access to resources.

She first excavated an apartment compound in the mid-1980s on its northeastern fringe where stucco workers lived and had access to luxury goods including mica and fine ceramics.

Stylish suburbs: how ancient Mexican metropolis dodged inequality trap
Men work at one of the multi-family apartments at La Ventilla [Credit: David Carballo/
Proyecto Arqueologico Tlajnga (PATT) via Reuters]
Refugees fleeing areas buried under ash were likely absorbed through work programs in a city that placed a higher value on social groups than individuals, resulting in social classes less sharply divided by access to resources, Manzanilla argues.

About a third of Tlajinga’s residents may have been migrants, earlier digs based on tooth signatures revealed, and foreigner enclaves have been found across Teotihuacan with at least four foreign languages spoken aside from the local tongue, likely a precursor to Aztec Nahuatl or Otomi.

Teotihuacan’s history offers an intriguing counterpoint to modern tensions often stoked by migration.

“We should learn from its more than five-century run,” she said.

Author: David Alire Garcia | Source: Reuters [December 21, 2019]



* This article was originally published here

Bloomed flowers on 30th December 2019

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Channel: UFO Odessa  

I found flowers on the streets, taking into account that there are frosts on the street, the flowers began to bloom on dry stems. I am very pleasantly surprised at night the temperature is below zero Celsius.

Video length: 1:10
Category: Travel & Events
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‘Balnuaran of Clava’ Chambered Cairn Complex Photoset 1, Inverness, Scotland 21.12.19.

‘Balnuaran of Clava’ Chambered Cairn Complex Photoset 1, Inverness, Scotland 21.12.19.



* This article was originally published here

57 ancient tombs found in south China


Nearly 500 archaeological items have been found in 57 ancient tombs in south China's Guangdong Province, a local cultural heritage and archaeology institute said Thursday.

57 ancient tombs found in south China
Credit: Xinhua


The tombs, dating back to periods between the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.- 220 A.D.) and the Qing Dynasty (1644 A.D.-1911 A.D.), were unearthed in construction sites in the provincial capital Guangzhou.

57 ancient tombs found in south China
57 ancient tombs found in south China
57 ancient tombs found in south China
57 ancient tombs found in south China
Credit: Xinhua


57 ancient tombs found in south China
57 ancient tombs found in south China
57 ancient tombs found in south China
57 ancient tombs found in south China
Credit: Xinhua
There are 11 tombs from the Han Dynasty, and 13 tombs from the Jin and Southern Dynasties (266 A.D.- 589 A.D.), both relatively large in number and scale, said Yi Xibin, deputy head of the Guangzhou Municipal Institute of Cultural Heritage and Archaeology.


The unearthed items include pottery objects, bronze ware, ironware and beadwork. They offer rich materials for studying the historical and geographical changes in Guangzhou, Yi said.

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Halo Lightning in the Caribbean

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Channel: Frankie Lucena  

This Halo was generated by a powerful lightning bolt just south of the Dominican Republic on the night of Sept 5th 2019.

Video length: 0:13
Category: Science & Technology
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2019 December 31 M33: The Triangulum Galaxy Image Credit &...



2019 December 31

M33: The Triangulum Galaxy
Image Credit & Copyright: Rui Liao

Explanation: The small, northern constellation Triangulum harbors this magnificent face-on spiral galaxy, M33. Its popular names include the Pinwheel Galaxy or just the Triangulum Galaxy. M33 is over 50,000 light-years in diameter, third largest in the Local Group of galaxies after the Andromeda Galaxy (M31), and our own Milky Way. About 3 million light-years from the Milky Way, M33 is itself thought to be a satellite of the Andromeda Galaxy and astronomers in these two galaxies would likely have spectacular views of each other’s grand spiral star systems. As for the view from planet Earth, this sharp image shows off M33’s blue star clusters and pinkish star forming regions along the galaxy’s loosely wound spiral arms. In fact, the cavernous NGC 604 is the brightest star forming region, seen here at about the 7 o'clock position from the galaxy center. Like M31, M33’s population of well-measured variable stars have helped make this nearby spiral a cosmic yardstick for establishing the distance scale of the Universe.

∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap191231.html



* This article was originally published here

‘Balnuaran of Clava’ Chambered Cairn Complex Photoset 2, Inverness, Scotland 21.12.19.

‘Balnuaran of Clava’ Chambered Cairn Complex Photoset 2, Inverness, Scotland 21.12.19.



* This article was originally published here

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