воскресенье, 24 ноября 2019 г.

The “Goodbye Ryugu” campaign












JAXA - Hayabusa2 Mission patch.

Nov. 22, 2019


Image above: Asteroid Ryugu captured with the Optical Navigation Camera - Telescopic (ONC-T) immediately after departure. Image time is November 13 10:15 JST (onboard time), 2019. Image Credits: JAXA, Chiba Institute of Technology, University of Tokyo, Kochi University, Rikkyo University, Nagoya University, Meiji University, University of Aizu, AIST.

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Storm coming to Odessa August 2019

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Channel: UFO Odessa  

Thunder storm approach on August 3 2019 near Odessa city
Дождь идёт на Одессу, 3 августа

Video length: 1:30
Category: Entertainment
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ESO Telescope Reveals What Could be the Smallest Dwarf Planet Yet in the Solar System

SPHERE image of Hygiea
 
SPHERE images of Hygiea, Vesta and Ceres


Videos

ESOcast 211 Light: ESO Telescope Reveals What Could be the Smallest Dwarf Planet in the Solar System
ESOcast 211 Light: ESO Telescope Reveals What Could be the Smallest Dwarf Planet in the Solar System

Location of Hygiea in the Solar System
Location of Hygiea in the Solar System

Impact simulation explaining the origin of Hygiea’s round shape
Impact simulation explaining the origin of Hygiea’s round shape



Astronomers using ESO’s SPHERE instrument at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) have revealed that the asteroid Hygiea could be classified as a dwarf planet. The object is the fourth largest in the asteroid belt after Ceres, Vesta and Pallas. For the first time, astronomers have observed Hygiea in sufficiently high resolution to study its surface and determine its shape and size. They found that Hygiea is spherical, potentially taking the crown from Ceres as the smallest dwarf planet in the Solar System.

As an object in the main asteroid belt, Hygiea satisfies right away three of the four requirements to be classified as a dwarf planet: it orbits around the Sun, it is not a moon and, unlike a planet, it has not cleared the neighbourhood around its orbit. The final requirement is that it has enough mass for its own gravity to pull it into a roughly spherical shape. This is what VLT observations have now revealed about Hygiea.

Thanks to the unique capability of the SPHERE instrument on the VLT, which is one of the most powerful imaging systems in the world, we could resolve Hygiea’s shape, which turns out to be nearly spherical,” says lead researcher Pierre Vernazza from the Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille in France. “Thanks to these images, Hygiea may be reclassified as a dwarf planet, so far the smallest in the Solar System.

The team also used the SPHERE observations to constrain Hygiea’s size, putting its diameter at just over 430 km. Pluto, the most famous of dwarf planets, has a diameter close to 2400 km, while Ceres is close to 950 km in size.Surprisingly, the observations also revealed that Hygiea lacks the very large impact crater that scientists expected to see on its surface, the team report in the study published today in Nature Astronomy. Hygiea is the main member of one of the largest asteroid families, with close to 7000 members that all originated from the same parent body. Astronomers expected the event that led to the formation of this numerous family to have left a large, deep mark on Hygiea.

 “This result came as a real surprise as we were expecting the presence of a large impact basin, as is the case on Vesta,” says Vernazza. Although the astronomers observed Hygiea’s surface with a 95% coverage, they could only identify two unambiguous craters. “Neither of these two craters could have been caused by the impact that originated the Hygiea family of asteroids whose volume is comparable to that of a 100 km-sized object. They are too small,” explains study co-author Miroslav Brož of the Astronomical Institute of Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic.

The team decided to investigate further. Using numerical simulations, they deduced that Hygiea’s spherical shape and large family of asteroids are likely the result of a major head-on collision with a large projectile of diameter between 75 and 150 km. Their simulations show this violent impact, thought to have occurred about 2 billion years ago, completely shattered the parent body. Once the left-over pieces reassembled, they gave Hygiea its round shape and thousands of companion asteroids. “Such a collision between two large bodies in the asteroid belt is unique in the last 3–4 billion years,” says Pavel Ševeček, a PhD student at the Astronomical Institute of Charles University who also participated in the study.

Studying asteroids in detail has been possible thanks not only to advances in numerical computation, but also to more powerful telescopes. “Thanks to the VLT and the new generation adaptive-optics instrument SPHERE, we are now imaging main belt asteroids with unprecedented resolution, closing the gap between Earth-based and interplanetary mission observations,” Vernazza concludes.



More Information

This research was presented in a paper to appear in Nature Astronomy on 28 October.

The team is composed of P. Vernazza (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France), L. Jorda (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France), P. Ševeček (Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic), M. Brož (Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic), M. Viikinkoski (Mathematics and Statistics, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland), J. Hanuš (Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic), B. Carry (Université Côte d'Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice, France), A. Drouard (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France), M. Ferrais (Space Sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research Institute, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium), M. Marsset (Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), F. Marchis (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France, and SETI Institute, Carl Sagan Center, Mountain View, USA), M. Birlan (Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France), E. Podlewska-Gaca (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland, and Institute of Physics, University of Szczecin, Poland), E. Jehin (Space Sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research Institute, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium), P. Bartczak (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland), G. Dudzinski (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland), J. Berthier (Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France), J. Castillo-Rogez (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA), F. Cipriani (European Space Agency, ESTEC – Scientific Support Office, The Netherlands), F. Colas (Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France), F. DeMeo (Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA), C. Dumas (TMT Observatory, Pasadena, USA), J. Durech (Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic), R. Fetick (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France and ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, Chatillon Cedex, France), T. Fusco (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France and and ONERA, The French Aerospace Lab, Chatillon Cedex, France), J. Grice (Université Côte d'Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice, France and Open University, School of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes, UK), M. Kaasalainen (Mathematics and Statistics, Tampere University, Tampere, Finland), A. Kryszczynska (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland), P. Lamy (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France), H. Le Coroller (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France), A. Marciniak (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland), T. Michalowski (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland), P. Michel (Université Côte d'Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice, France), N. Rambaux (Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France), T. Santana-Ros (Departamento de Fı́sica, Universidad de Alicante, Alicante, Spain), P. Tanga (Université Côte d'Azur, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, CNRS, Laboratoire Lagrange, Nice, France), F. Vachier (Observatoire de Paris, Paris, France), A. Vigan (Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, Marseille, France), O. Witasse (European Space Agency, ESTEC – Scientific Support Office, The Netherlands), B. Yang (European Southern Observatory, Santiago, Chile), M. Gillon (Space Sciences, Technologies and Astrophysics Research Institute, Université de Liège, Liège, Belgium), Z. Benkhaldoun (Oukaimeden Observatory, High Energy Physics and Astrophysics Laboratory, Cadi Ayyad University, Marrakech, Morocco), R. Szakats (Konkoly Observatory, Research Centre for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary), R. Hirsch (Astronomical Observatory Institute, Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, Poland), R. Duffard (Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Glorieta de la Astronomía S/N, Granada, Spain), A. Chapman (Buenos Aires, Argentina), J. L. Maestre (Observatorio de Albox, Almeria, Spain).

ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It has 16 Member States: Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile and with Australia as a Strategic Partner. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope and its world-leading Very Large Telescope Interferometer as well as two survey telescopes, VISTA working in the infrared and the visible-light VLT Survey Telescope. Also at Paranal ESO will host and operate the Cherenkov Telescope Array South, the world’s largest and most sensitive gamma-ray observatory. ESO is also a major partner in two facilities on Chajnantor, APEX and ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre Extremely Large Telescope, the ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.



Links



Contacts

Pierre Vernazza
Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Marseille
Marseille, France
Tel: +33 4 91 05 59 11
Email: pierre.vernazza@lam.fr

Miroslav Brož
Charles University
Prague, Czech Republic
Email: mira@sirrah.troja.mff.cuni.cz

Pavel Ševeček
Charles University
Prague, Czech Republic
Email: pavel.sevecek@gmail.com

Bárbara Ferreira
ESO Public Information Officer
Garching bei München, Germany
Tel: +49 89 3200 6670
Email: pio@eso.org


Souce: ESO/News




* This article was originally published here

Spherical Ball Of Electricity

216 views   24 likes   0 dislikes  

Channel: Terry's Theories  

This video was recorded on the 20th of Oct. 2019 in Scotland by the youtube channel AcidAndy RFC. It shows some kind of spherical ball of electricity That hovers above a electrical power station. What do you guys think this is, a malfunction in the power grid maybe some kind of natural occurence of lighting like globe or ball lighting? Could it be something else, you decide.
Source video is AcidAndy RFC all the credit goes to him and his channel.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fg-_WEDMBgA

Video length: 2:50
Category: Science & Technology
5 comments

2019 November 24 Apollo 12: Self-Portrait Image Credit: NASA,...



2019 November 24

Apollo 12: Self-Portrait
Image Credit: NASA, Apollo 12, Charles Conrad

Explanation: Is this image art? 50 years ago, Apollo 12 astronaut-photographer Charles “Pete” Conrad recorded this masterpiece while documenting colleague Alan Bean’s lunar soil collection activities on Oceanus Procellarum. The featured image is dramatic and stark. The harsh environment of the Moon’s Ocean of Storms is echoed in Bean’s helmet, a perfectly composed reflection of Conrad and the lunar horizon. Works of photojournalists originally intent on recording the human condition on planet Earth, such as Lewis W. Hine’s images from New York City in the early 20th century, or Margaret Bourke-White’s magazine photography are widely regarded as art. Similarly many documentary astronomy and space images might also be appreciated for their artistic and esthetic appeal.

∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap191124.html



* This article was originally published here

Bizarre craft over Cuba

2221 views   51 likes   5 dislikes  

Channel: Terry's Theories  

Very strangely designed craft seen in broad daylight in the skies of Cuba.Video was uploaded on July 8th of this year by YouTube channel Joel H. other than that I hate to say that is all the information available on this video.
Source video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NYqV3nV6FNs

Video length: 2:42
Category: Science & Technology
49 comments

An alarming discovery in the blood of an astronaut













ISS - International Space Station logo.

Nov. 23, 2019

Astronauts at the International Space Station have discovered an additional risk to past space travel.

This discovery proves the importance of conducting more in-depth research into the risks astronauts face in space. Image Credits: Niketh Vellanki via Unsplash.

Astronauts are not just people who have the chance to visually check that Earth is round. These are also important topics of study when trying to find out what effects space produces on the human body.

On Earth, astronauts are regularly subjected to battery tests to measure their vital signs and physical condition. In space, the cosmonauts take care themselves to carry out these tests. During an ultrasound, one of them realized that a blood clot had formed in one of his veins, to the surprise of the specialist who was assisting him in real time from the Earth.

"We were not expecting it," says Karina Marshall-Goebel, NASA's chief scientist and author of a study on the subject. "It has never been reported before." Other NASA physicians have intervened to treat the astronaut remotely using anticoagulants.

This is not the first time that we notice significant side effects in people who spend time in orbit: optic nerves swollen, eyes a little flattened and vision deteriorated due to increased pressure intracranial.

The need to conduct studies on astronauts

To understand how this blood clot had developed, scientists studied the jugular vein of eleven astronauts, nine men and two women on a mission aboard the ISS, the international space station. Their blood flow was measured, sitting, lying down and tilting. Then participants were asked to repeat the same tests in the space.

Scientists found that blood flow stopped in five of the eleven astronauts. Yet, it is not common for blood to stagnate in this kind of veins. Usually, it happens in the legs, when sitting too long without moving.

Blood clot. Image Credit: Wikimedia

Sometimes the blood clot dissolves itself or with anticoagulants. But other times, it can cause significant blockages. In the case of two astronauts, the researchers realized that their blood had begun to turn around in the jugular vein, probably because it was blocked downstream.

Karina Marshall-Goebel hypothesizes that the organs are brought up inside their bodies, causing dysfunctions of their blood circulation. Once back on Earth, the astronauts no longer had problematic blood clots and their health has returned to normal.

This discovery, however, has shown the importance of conducting more in-depth research into the risks that astronauts face in space. Because if it takes only a few hours to return to Earth from the ISS, it would take months to return from Mars for example. Not to mention that astronauts maintain excellent physical fitness, which is not necessarily the case for everyone willing to pay to participate in the SpaceX project.

Related link:

Assessment of Jugular Venous Blood Flow Stasis and Thrombosis During Spaceflight
https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2755307

Space Station Research and Technology: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

International Space Station (ISS): https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html

Images (mentioned), Text, Credits: NASA/Michael B. Stenger, PhD/Marshall-Goebel K et al./SLATE/Orbiter.ch Aerospace/Roland Berga.

Greetings, Orbiter.ch

* This article was originally published here

Fun cat reaction listening to music.

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Channel: UFO Odessa  

The cat was sitting on the roof and listening to music, the stranger’s cat isn’t mine, the strangers are usually scared, this cat basked in the sun and listened to the vocal national music of the North Asian people, throat singing.Кот сидел на крыше и слушал музыку, кот чужой, обычно чужие пугаются, этот кот грелся на солнце и слушал вокальную национальную музыку северных азиатских народов, горловое пение.

Video length: 4:45
Category: Entertainment
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TESS reveals an improbable planet

Another red giant and another exoplanet, but until we know more, they all look more or less the same. 
Illustration: ESA.

Using asteroseismology, a team led by an Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) researcher, studied two red-giant stars known to host exoplanets, and for one of them found a seemingly improbable planet. Several researchers connected to SAC are co-authors.

Surprise: An exoplanet shouldn't have survived the expansion of it's red giant star, but still it is there.
Using asteroseismic data from NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an international team, led by Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço (IA) researcher Tiago Campante, studied the red-giant stars HD 212771 and HD 203949. These are the first detections of oscillations in previously known exoplanet-host stars by TESS. The result was published 29 October 2019 in an article in The Astrophysical Journal.

Tiago Campante (IA & Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto - FCUP) explains that detecting these oscillations was only possible because: “TESS observations are precise enough to allow measuring the gentle pulsations at the surfaces of stars. These two fairly evolved stars also host planets, providing the ideal testbed for studies of the evolution of planetary systems.

Having determined the physical properties of both stars, such as their mass, size and age, through asteroseismology, the authors then focused their attention on the evolutionary state of HD 203949. Their aim was to understand how its planet could have avoided engulfment, since  the envelope of the star would have expanded well beyond the current planetary orbit  during the red-giant phase of evolution.

Exoplanethunter TESS - now through half of it's nominal mission.
Illustration: NASA.

Co-author Vardan Adibekyan (IA & Universidade do Porto) comments: “This study is a perfect demonstration of how stellar and exoplanetary astrophysics are linked together. Stellar analysis seems to suggest that the star is too evolved to still host a planet at such a 'short' orbital distance, while from the exoplanet analysis we know that the planet is there! 

By performing extensive numerical simulations, the team thinks that star-planet tides might have brought the planet inward from its original, wider orbit, placing it where we see it today. Adibekyan adds: “The solution to this scientific dilemma is hidden in the 'simple fact' that stars and their planets not only form but also evolve together. In this particular case, the planet managed to avoid  engulfment.

In the past decade, asteroseismology has had a significant impact on the study of solar-type and red-giant stars, which exhibit convection-driven, solar-like oscillations. These studies have advanced considerably with space-based observatories like CoRoT (CNES/ESA) and Kepler (NASA), and are set to continue in the next decade with TESS and PLATO (ESA).

Tiago Campante explains that: “IA's involvement in TESS is at the level of the scientific coordination within the TESS Asteroseismic Science Consortium (TASC). TASC is a large and unique scientific collaboration, bringing together all relevant research groups and individuals from around the world who are actively engaged in research in the field of asteroseismology. Following in the footsteps of its successful predecessor, the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC), TASC is based on a collaborative and transparent working-group structure, aimed at facilitating open collaboration between scientists.



* This article was originally published here

Meteorite fall on July 9 // Caída de meteorito del 9 de julio

67308 views   100 likes   6 dislikes  

Channel: Meteors  

This meteor event was recorded over Andalusia and the Mediterranean Sea on 9 July 2018 at 5:13 local time (3:13 universal time). The event was produced by a fragment from an asteroid that hit the atmosphere at about 65000 km/h. The fireball began at an altitude of around 89 km over the province of Almería, and ended at a height of about 31 km over the Sea. The analysis of its atmospheric path shows that this was a potential meteorite-producing event. The meteorite would have fallen into the sea, with a mass of just a few grams. The event was recorded by the meteor observing stations operated by the SMART Project from the astronomical observatories of Calar Alto, La Sagra, La Hita and Sevilla.
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Esta impresionante bola de fuego sobrevoló Almería y el mar Mediterráneo frente a las costas de Murcia el 9 de julio a las 5:13 hora local (lo que equivale a las 3:13 en tiempo universal). Se produjo como consecuencia de la entrada en la atmósfera terrestre de un fragmento procedente de un asteroide a una velocidad de unos 65 mil km/h. El fenómeno luminoso se inició a una altitud de unos 89 km sobre la provincia de Almería, y finalizó a una altura de unos 31 km frente a las costas de Murcia. El análisis de su trayectoria atmosférica revela que este evento podría haber producido un meteorito, si bien el fragmento que ha conseguido sobrevivir a su brusco paso por la atmósfera tendría una masa de tan solo unos pocos gramos y habría caído al mar. La bola de fuego ha podido ser grabada por los detectores que operan en el marco del proyecto SMART desde los observatorios astronómicos de Calar Alto, La Sagra, La Hita y Sevilla.

Video length: 1:34
Category: Science & Technology
6 comments

Nether Largie Prehistoric Standing Stone Complex, Kilmartin Glen, Argyll, Scotland, 23.11.19.

Nether Largie Prehistoric Standing Stone Complex, Kilmartin Glen, Argyll, Scotland, 23.11.19.



* This article was originally published here

Spitzer Telescope Spots a Ghoulish Gourd

This infrared image from NASA's Spitzer Space telescope shows a cloud of gas and dust carved out by a massive star. A drawing overlaid on the image reveals why researchers nicknamed this region the "Jack-o'-lantern Nebula." Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.  › Full image and caption

A carved-out cloud of gas and dust looks like a celestial jack-o'-lantern in this image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

A massive star - known as an O-type star and about 15 to 20 times heavier than the Sun - is likely responsible for sculpting this cosmic pumpkin. A recent study of the region suggests that the powerful outflow of radiation and particles from the star likely swept the surrounding dust and gas outward, creating deep gouges in this cloud, which is known as a nebula.

Spitzer, which detects infrared light, saw the star glowing like a candle at the center of a hollowed-out pumpkin. The study's authors have fittingly nicknamed the structure the "Jack-o'-lantern Nebula."

A plethora of objects in the universe emit infrared light, often as heat, so objects tend to radiate more infrared light the warmer they are.

Invisible to the human eye, three wavelengths of infrared light compose the multicolor image of the nebula seen here. Green and red represent light emitted primarily by dust radiating at different temperatures, though some stars radiate prominently in these wavelengths as well. The combination of green and red in the image creates yellow hues. Blue represents a wavelength mostly emitted, in this image, by stars and some very hot regions of the nebula, while white regions indicate where the objects are bright in all three colors. The O-type star appears as a white spot in the center of a red dust shell near the center of the scooped-out region.

A high-contrast version of the same image makes the red wavelength more pronounced. Together, the red and green wavelengths create an orange hue. The picture highlights contours in the dust as well as the densest regions of the nebula, which appear brightest.

The study that produced these observations appears in the Astrophysical Journal and examined a region in the outer region of the Milky Way galaxy. (Our Sun is halfway to the edge of the disk-shaped galaxy.) Researchers used infrared light to count the very young stars in different stages of early development in this region. They also counted protostars - infant stars still swaddled in the dense dust clouds in which they were born. When combined with tallies of adult stars in these regions, these data will help scientists determine whether the rates of star and planet formation in the galaxy's outer regions differ from the rates in middle and inner regions.

Scientists already know that conditions differ slightly in those outer areas. For example, interstellar clouds of gas and dust are colder and more sparsely distributed there than they are near the center of the galaxy (which may reduce the rate of star formation). Star-forming clouds in those outer areas also contain lower amounts of heavy chemical elements, including carbon, oxygen and other ingredients for life as we know it. Eventually, more studies like this one might also determine whether planets similar in composition to Earth are more or less common in the outer galaxy than in our local galactic neighborhood.

The data used to create this image was collected during Spitzer's "cold mission," which ran between 2004 and 2009.

For more information about Spitzer, go to: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/spitzer/main/index.html

News Media Contact

Calla Cofield
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif.
626-808-2469
calla.e.cofield@jpl.nasa.gov





* This article was originally published here

Cometary meteor event on Nov.11 at 4:11 local time//Bola de fuego del 11Nov. a las 4:11 horas

15256 views   31 likes   0 dislikes  

Channel: Meteors  

The meteor on this video was recorded over southern Spain on 11 Nov. 2018 at 4:11 local time (3:11 universal time). It was generated by a rock from a comet that hit the atmosphere at about 75,000 km/h. The meteor overflew the provinces of Granada and Málaga. It began over Granada at an altitude of about 130 km and ended over Málaga at a height of around 79 km. The event was recorded in the framework of the SMART project from the meteor-observing stations located at La Hita (Toledo), Calar Alto (Almeria), La Sagra (Granada) and Sevilla.
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La bola de fuego que aparece en este vídeo sobrevoló Andalucía el 11 de noviembre a las 4:11 hora local (que equivalen a la 3:11 en tiempo universal). Se produjo al entrar en la atmósfera terrestre una roca procedente de un cometa a una velocidad de unos 75 mil kilómetros por hora. El evento se inició a una altitud de unos 133 km sobre la vertical de Almuñécar (Granada), desde donde continuó en dirección noroeste para finalizar a una altitud de unos 79 km sobre la provincia de Málaga, prácticamente en la vertical de Antequera.

Este evento ha sido registrado por los detectores del proyecto SMART que operan en los observatorios astronómicos de La Hita (Toledo), Calar Alto (Almería), Sierra Nevada (Granada), La Sagra (Granada) y Sevilla.

Video length: 0:58
Category: Science & Technology
0 comments

CASC - Long March-3B launches two BeiDou-3 satellites













BeiDou Navigation Satellite System logo.

Nov. 23, 2019

Long March-3B launches two BeiDou-3 satellites

A Long March-3B launch vehicle, with an Yuanzheng-1 (Expedition-1) upper stage, launched two new BeiDou-3 navigation satellites from the Xichang Satellite Launch Center, Sichuan Province, southwest China, on 23 November 2019, at 00:55 UTC (08:55 local time).

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Temple Wood Prehistoric Stone Circle and Cist Cairn, Kilmartin Glen, Argyll, Scotland, 23.11.19.

Temple Wood Prehistoric Stone Circle and Cist Cairn, Kilmartin Glen, Argyll, Scotland, 23.11.19.



* This article was originally published here

Flashing Object in Canes Venatici & Coma Berenices Night vision satellite & UFO Hunting

215 views   15 likes   0 dislikes  

Channel: déjà vu  

A late night shoot with the intention of catching some meteor activity ended up in tracking a slow moving flashing object for about 45 minutes.

Equipment used for filming-

Canon 60D through a Twiggy L4A1 + P8079HP image intensified F350mm telescope.

Canon Rebel T3i + P8079HP intensifier through a 50mm lens.

© Music, ambient sounds and atmospherics created by déjà vu

Video length: 4:26
Category: Education
14 comments

Chandra Archive Collection: Combing Through the "X-ray Files"

N103B, LHA 120-N 44, LMC N63A, DEM L71, SNR J0534.2-7033 (DEM L238), N132D
Credit: Enhanced Image by Judy Schmidt (CC BY-NC-SA) based on images provided courtesy of NASA/CXC/SAO & NASA/STScI (all images)




N103B
When a thermonuclear explosion destroyed a white dwarf star (the dense final stage in the evolution of a Sun-like star) in a double star system and produced a supernova, it left behind this glowing debris field, called a supernova remnant. The Chandra X-ray data (most clearly visible on the left side of the remnant in red, green and blue) shows multimillion-degree gas that has been heated by a shock wave produced by the explosion that destroyed the star. An optical light image from the Hubble Space Telescope is brightest on the right side of the image, where the overlap with X-rays is mostly in pink and white. 

LHA 120-N 44
This region of star formation features a giant bubble that is blowing out from the middle of this image due to winds flowing off young stars. Chandra data (purple and pink) show this superbubble of hot gas, while Hubble data (orange and light blue) reveals the gas and dust in the system.

LMC N63A
After a massive star exploded, it left behind this supernova remnant observed by Chandra and Hubble. The Chandra data (red, green and blue) show multimillion-degree gas and the blast wave from the supernova. The light brown region in the upper right of the remnant is a dense cloud of gas and dust that reflects optical light detected by Hubble.

DEM L71
The Chandra image of this supernova remnant (also known as SNR 0505.7-6752) reveals an inner cloud of glowing iron and silicon (green and blue) surrounded by an outer blast wave (red). The outer blast wave, created during the destruction of the white dwarf star, is also seen in optical data from Hubble (red and white).

SNR J0534.2-7033 (DEM L238)
Another supernova remnant resulting from the explosion of a white dwarf star is revealed in this image of DEM L238, also known as SNR J0534.2-7033. The Chandra image (yellow, green and bright red) shows multimillion-degree gas and the Hubble image shows cooler gas in the system, near the outer border of the remnant in red.

N132D
This is the brightest supernova remnant in either the LMC or its galactic cousin, the Small Magellanic Cloud. N132D also stands out because it belongs to a rare class of supernova remnants that have relatively high levels of oxygen. Scientists think most of the oxygen we breathe came from explosions similar to this one. Here, Chandra data are shown in purple and green and Hubble data are shown in red. 

NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center manages the Chandra program. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Chandra X-ray Center controls science and flight operations from Cambridge, Massachusetts.





* This article was originally published here

Nether Largie South Cairn Prehistoric Burial Chamber Monochromes, Kilmartin Glen, Argyll, 23.11.19.

Nether Largie South Cairn Prehistoric Burial Chamber Monochromes, Kilmartin Glen, Argyll, 23.11.19.



* This article was originally published here

Clear Recording Of Orb Darting Around In The Sky!

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Channel: Terry's Theories  

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Pretty clear capture of ord darting around in the sky I don't have a location yet I will continue to work on that and will post it as soon as I do for those interested.
This video came from the Youtube channel UFO Hunter he has got a great channel go check him out. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCMsUeAGNeLaN09eviRQzuUg

Source video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxOmbxyXltA

Video length: 1:52
Category: Science & Technology
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