воскресенье, 28 апреля 2019 г.

Image of the Week — April 29, 2019CIL:39091 -…


Image of the Week — April 29, 2019


CIL:39091http://www.cellimagelibrary.org/images/39091


Description: Light micrograph of elastic cartilage of the ear. This type of cartilage is made from a protein called elastin and is formed from a network of elastic fibers and collagen. The fibers form bundles which give the structure flexibility. The elastic cartilage shown in this image is from the outer ear, however, this type of cartilage is also found in larynx and epiglottis. A lower magnification view is available as CIL:39093.


Author: Ivor Mason


Licensing: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 UK)


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Viruses and Clots With a viral infection comes an increased…


Viruses and Clots


With a viral infection comes an increased risk of a heart attack, caused by a clot blocking blood flow to the heart. But why isn’t clear. Key to formation of blood clots are the circulating platelets and so researchers looked to see how they behave during a viral infection. Here, electron microscopy reveals flu virus particles (dark spheres) being engulfed by a platelet, watched over time until the virus is completely internalised (bottom right). Engulfing the virus makes the platelets release a chemical called C3 which causes immune cells called neutrophils to release their DNA. This act is thought to be beneficial as it prevents viruses commandeering that genetic code for their own replication. However, there’s a downside: these broken, sticky neutrophils aggregate with the platelets. It’s these clumps that may be contributing to the higher chance of a heart attack.


Written by Lindsey Goff



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2019 April 28 All of Mercury Image Credit: NASA/JHU Applied…


2019 April 28


All of Mercury
Image Credit: NASA/JHU Applied Physics Lab/Carnegie Inst. Washington


Explanation: Only six years ago, the entire surface of planet Mercury was finally mapped. Detailed observations of the innermost planet’s surprising crust began when the robotic have been ongoing since the robotic MESSENGER spacecraft first passed Mercury in 2008 and continued until its controlled crash landing in 2015. Previously, much of the Mercury’s surface was unknown as it is too far for Earth-bound telescopes to see clearly, while the Mariner 10 flybys in the 1970s observed only about half. The featured video is a compilation of thousands of images of Mercury rendered in exaggerated colors to better contrast different surface features. Visible on the rotating world are rays emanating from a northern impact that stretch across much of the planet, while about half-way through the video the light colored Caloris Basin rotates into view, a northern ancient impact feature that filled with lava. Recent analysis of MESSENGER data indicates that Mercury has a solid inner core.


∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap190428.html


ancientpeopleancientplaces: ‘Dermis’ PoemWritten by The Silicon…


ancientpeopleancientplaces:



‘Dermis’ Poem


Written by The Silicon Tribesman. All rights reserved, 2019.



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‘Circle of Hearts’, North American Indian Medicine Wheel and Modern Stone...











‘Circle of Hearts’, North American Indian Medicine Wheel and Modern Stone Circle, Milton Keynes, 22.4.19.


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ancientpeopleancientplaces: ‘Unwritten’ PoemWritten by The…


ancientpeopleancientplaces:



‘Unwritten’ Poem


Written by The Silicon Tribesman. All Rights Reserved, 2019.



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Woodhenge, Wiltshire, 21.4.19.

Woodhenge, Wiltshire, 21.4.19.










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Boning Up To construct a building from scratch, you might…


Boning Up


To construct a building from scratch, you might first build a basic shell or scaffold, then replace that with the permanent structure. Building new bone is similar. An intermediate cartilage structure is established first, only to be converted to solid bone subsequently. This process is supported by a dense network of blood vessels, but exactly how they help is unclear. A new study has found that a particular type of these vessels, known as type H (yellow in the bone section pictured, with vessels stained green and red), help replace the cartilage when it’s time. Specifically, the vessels steer bone growth direction, and endothelial cells lining them lead the cartilage breakdown. Excessive cartilage damage is a hallmark of arthritis, and improving bone repair would benefit countless injured patients, so the next step is asking whether we can control and harness this important function of blood vessels.


Written by Anthony Lewis



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