воскресенье, 2 сентября 2018 г.

Cairnholy I Burial Chamber, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 31.8.18.A substantial...











Cairnholy I Burial Chamber, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 31.8.18.


A substantial passage grave with an earlier internal chamber and an extensive facade.


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White Cairn Passage Grave, Glentrool, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 1.9.18.A well...











White Cairn Passage Grave, Glentrool, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 1.9.18.


A well preserved passage grave, excavated in the first half of the twentieth century. Pottery and axe heads found. Used through the Neolithic and the Bronze Age from about 4000 years ago.


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2018 September 2 A Powerful Solar Flare Video Credit: SOHO…


2018 September 2


A Powerful Solar Flare
Video Credit: SOHO Consortium, LASCO, ESA, NASA


Explanation: It was one of the most powerful solar flares in recorded history. Occurring in 2003 and seen across the electromagnetic spectrum, the Sun briefly became over 100 times brighter in X-rays than normal. The day after this tremendous X 17 solar flare – and subsequent Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) – energetic particles emitted from the explosions struck the Earth, creating auroras and affecting satellites. The spacecraft that took these frames – SOHO – was put in a turtle-like safe mode to avoid further damage from this and subsequent solar particle storms. The featured time-lapse movie condenses into 10 seconds events that occurred over 4 hours. The CME, visible around the central sun-shade, appears about three-quarters of the way through the video, while frames toward the very end are progressively noisier as protons from the explosions strike SOHO’s LASCO detector. One this day in 1859, the effects of an even more powerful solar storm caused telegraphs on Earth to spark in what is known as the Carrington Event. Powerful solar storms such as these may create beautiful aurora-filled skies, but they also pose a real danger as they can damage satellites and even power grids across the Earth.


∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180902.html


Drumtrodden Standing Stones, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 31.8.18.A stone row of...











Drumtrodden Standing Stones, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 31.8.18.


A stone row of three massive orthostats, two of which are fallen.


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Cairnholy II Burial Chamber, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 31.8.18.The one of two...











Cairnholy II Burial Chamber, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland, 31.8.18.


The one of two prehistoric passage graves in the vicinity of 50 metres. Whilst their contents were partially robbed and the soil acidity didn’t preserve much in the way of bones or organic material, these two sites attract much interest, partially because of their beautiful location and also because of their very individual forms.


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What’s Up For September 2018?

Outstanding views Venus, Jupiter, Saturn and Mars with the naked eye!


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You’ll have to look quickly after sunset to catch Venus. And through binoculars or a telescope, you’ll see Venus’s phase change dramatically during September – from nearly half phase to a larger thinner crescent!


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Jupiter, Saturn and Mars continue their brilliant appearances this month. Look southwest after sunset.


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Use the summer constellations help you trace the Milky Way.


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Sagittarius: where stars and some brighter clumps appear as steam from the teapot.


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Aquila: where the Eagle’s bright Star Altair, combined with Cygnus’s Deneb, and Lyra’s Vega mark the Summer Triangle. 


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Cassiopeia, the familiar “w”- shaped constellation completes the constellation trail through the Summer Milky Way. Binoculars will reveal double stars, clusters and nebulae. 


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Between September 12th and the 20th, watch the Moon pass from near Venus, above Jupiter, to the left of Saturn and finally above Mars! 


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Both Neptune and brighter Uranus can be spotted with some help from a telescope this month.



Look at about 1:00 a.m. local time or later in the southeastern sky. You can find Mercury just above Earth’s eastern horizon shortly before sunrise. Use the Moon as your guide on September 7 and 8th.



And although there are no major meteor showers in September, cometary dust appears in another late summer sight, the morning Zodiacal light. Try looking for it in the east on moonless mornings very close to sunrise. To learn more about the Zodiacal light, watch “What’s Up” from March 2018.



Watch the full What’s Up for September Video: 



There are so many sights to see in the sky. To stay informed, subscribe to our What’s Up video series on Facebook.


Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com


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