среда, 22 августа 2018 г.

Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка


Source: Smart dog boldly climbs the slope by Weathernature Source: Dog walking and nature by Weathernature Source: At the shore of the Volga River by Weathernature
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка
фотограф Паша Смольянин Тольятти Россия Сибирская лайка и Норвежская лосиная лайка

Красота заката Солнца и Каменные кольца Волга Тольятти Россия



Source: At the shore of the Volga River by Weathernature
Source: Beautiful sunset on the river bank by Weathernature Красота заката Солнца Тольятти Россия Красота заката Солнца Тольятти Россия фотограф Паша Смольянин 
Каменные кольца на Волге

Aboyne Stone Circle, Aboyne, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 17.8.18.A small, picturesque stone...









Aboyne Stone Circle, Aboyne, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, 17.8.18.


A small, picturesque stone circle in a woodland glade.


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2018 August 22 Asteroid Ryugu from Hayabusa2 Image Credit &…


2018 August 22


Asteroid Ryugu from Hayabusa2
Image Credit & Copyright: ISAS, JAXA,


Explanation: This big space diamond has an estimated value of over 80 billion dollars. It’s only diamond in shape, though – asteroid 162173 Ryugu is thought to be composed of mostly nickel and iron. Asteroids like Ryugu are interesting for several reasons, perhaps foremost because they are near the Earth and might, one day in the far future, pose an impact threat. In the nearer term, Ryugu is interesting because it may be possible to send future spacecraft there to mine it, thus providing humanity with a new source of valuable metals. Scientifically, Ryugu is interesting because it carries information about how our Solar System formed billions of years ago, and why its orbit takes it so close to Earth. Japan’s robotic spacecraft Hayabusa2 just arrived at this one-kilometer wide asteroid in late June. The featured image shows surface structures unknown before spacecraft Hayabusa2’s arrival, including rock fields and craters. Within the next three months, Hayabusa2 is scheduled to unleash several probes, some that will land on Ryugu and hop around, while Hayabusa2 itself will mine just a little bit of the asteroid for return to Earth.


∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180822.html


PanSTARRS (2017 S3) in 2nd outburst

On 30 June Comet PanSTARRS 2017 S3 caught astronomers attention as the ball of ice and dust endured an outburst resulting in a jump in magnitude from 12.5 to 9.5. As a result, the comet’s tail became more prominent emitting the classic green colour that comet observers are used to. Over the next few of days, the eruption (and brightness) had faded. 


Around July 14, the comet was at it again. Austrian comet astrophotographer Michael Jäger took the above image of the comet showing another jump in magnitude and tail prominence. Over the past year it has always been speculated that this object could reach a brightness within binocular visibility, however at this rate the comet could even become naked eye before its perihelion on August 15, 2018. It’s certainly one to watch so below are some star charts to help observers keep track of it.


Visibility before perihelion


For northern observers (above 50 degrees latitude), the comet is visible all night through July as the object races from Camelopardalis to Auriga low in the North East. The best time to observe the green comet in all its glory is in the early hours before sunrise as these constellations rise higher in to the night sky. Those located further south will have to wait until the early hours for S3 to rise above the horizon. Through August, the comet will sink further south in to twilight making it more and more difficult to observe from any location. 


Finder Charts









2017 S3 PanSTARRS Finder Chart  2017 S3 PanSTARRS Finder Chart

Click images to enlarge



The post PanSTARRS (2017 S3) in 2nd outburst appeared first on Comet Watch.


Spilling the Sun’s Secrets

You might think you know the Sun: It looks quiet and unchanging. But the Sun has secrets that scientists have been trying to figure out for decades.  


One of our new missions — Parker Solar Probe — is aiming to spill the Sun’s secrets and shed new light on our neighbor in the sky.



Even though it’s 93 million miles away, the Sun is our nearest and best laboratory for understanding the inner workings of stars everywhere. We’ve been spying on the Sun with a fleet of satellites for decades, but we’ve never gotten a close-up of our nearest star.


This summer, Parker Solar Probe is launching into an orbit that will take it far closer to the Sun than any instrument has ever gone. It will fly close enough to touch the Sun, sweeping through the outer atmosphere — the corona — 4 million miles above the surface.



This unique viewpoint will do a lot more than provide gossip on the Sun. Scientists will take measurements to help us understand the Sun’s secrets — including those that can affect Earth.


Parker Solar Probe is equipped with four suites of instruments that will take detailed measurements from within the Sun’s corona, all protected by a special heat shield to keep them safe and cool in the Sun’s ferocious heat.



The corona itself is home to one of the Sun’s biggest secrets: The corona’s mysteriously high temperatures. The corona, a region of the Sun’s outer atmosphere, is hundreds of times hotter than the surface below. That’s counterintuitive, like if you got warmer the farther you walked from a campfire, but scientists don’t yet know why that’s the case.



Some think the excess heat is delivered by electromagnetic waves called Alfvén waves moving outwards from the Sun’s surface. Others think it might be due to nanoflares — bomb-like explosions that occur on the Sun’s surface, similar to the flares we can see with telescopes from Earth, but smaller and much more frequent. Either way, Parker Solar Probe’s measurements direct from this region itself should help us pin down what’s really going on.



We also want to find out what exactly accelerates the solar wind — the Sun’s constant outpouring of material that rushes out at a million miles per hour and fills the Solar System far past the orbit of Pluto. The solar wind can cause space weather when it reaches Earth — triggering things like the aurora, satellite problems, and even, in rare cases, power outages.


We know where the solar wind comes from, and that it gains its speed somewhere in the corona, but the exact mechanism of that acceleration is a mystery. By sampling particles directly at the scene of the crime, scientists hope Parker Solar Probe can help crack this case.



Parker Solar Probe should also help us uncover the secrets of some of the fastest particles from the Sun. Solar energetic particles can reach speeds of more than 50% the speed of light, and they can interfere with satellites with little warning because of how fast they move. We don’t know how they get so fast — but it’s another mystery that should be solved with Parker Solar Probe on the case.  



Parker Solar Probe launches summer 2018 on a seven-year mission to touch the Sun. Keep up with the latest on the Sun at @NASASun on Twitter, and follow along with Parker Solar Probe’s last steps to launch at nasa.gov/solarprobe.


Make sure to follow us on Tumblr for your regular dose of space: http://nasa.tumblr.com.


‘Carn Liath, Iron Age Broch’ Walk Around Video 1 (Silent…


‘Carn Liath, Iron Age Broch’ Walk Around Video 1 (Silent Footage), A9 Road to Wick, The Highlands, Scotland, 18.8.18.


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NASA & JAXA GPM Satellite Finds Heavy Rainfall in Powerful Hurricane Lane


NASA & JAXA – Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) patch.


Aug. 21, 2018


Lane – Formerly 14E (Eastern Pacific)


Hurricane Lane had moved westward into the central Pacific Ocean far southeast of the Hawaiian Islands when NASA’s GPM core observatory satellite passed above and looked it the heavy rainfall it was generating. Hurricane Lane may be a threat to portions of the Hawaiian Islands this week.



Image above: On August 19, 2018 at 12:43 p.m. EDT (1643 UTC) the GPM satellite measured rainfall intensity measurements near hurricane Lane’s eye was over 143 mm (5.6 inches) per hour. Rain was falling at a rate of over 89 mm (3.5 inches) per hour in an intense feeder band wrapping around the northern side of the hurricane. The lowest cloud heights are blue while the tallest storm tops are shown in yellow.
Image Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce.


Hurricane Lane intensified and had maximum sustained winds reaching about 105 knots (~ 121 mph) when GPM passed overhead on August 19, 2018 at 12:43 p.m. EDT (1643 UTC).  This made it a category three on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.


The GPM satellite’s Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments provided highly accurate information about precipitation within the hurricane. GPM’s GMI revealed rainfall coverage and GPM’s radar (DPR Ku Band) provided precise rainfall intensity measurements near the hurricane’s eye. GPM’s radar found that rain was falling at a rate of over 89 mm (3.5 inches) per hour in an intense feeder band wrapping around the northern side of the hurricane. GPM’s DPR (shown in lighter shades) also measured precipitation in powerful storms in Lane’s eye wall that were dropping rain at a rate of over 143 mm (5.6 inches) per hour.


The GPM satellite’s radar data (DPR Ku Band) were used to provide a unique 3D cross-section view of rainfall intensity in hurricane LANE’s eye wall. DPR revealed that very strong downpours there were returning radar reflectivity values greater than 57 dBZ to the GPM satellite. GPM’s Ku band radar is capable of showing the 3D structure of precipitation to heights of 19 km (11.8 miles). Those GPM radar data revealed that the tops of very powerful storms in Lane’s eye wall were reaching heights above 14.3 km (8.9 miles).  GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.




GPM Video of Rainfall Inside Hurricane Lane


Video above: On August 19, 2018 at 12:43 p.m. EDT (1643 UTC) the GPM satellite measured rainfall intensity measurements near Hurricane Lane’s eye was over 143 mm (5.6 inches) per hour. Rain was falling at a rate of over 89 mm (3.5 inches) per hour in an intense feeder band wrapping around the northern side of the hurricane. The lowest cloud heights are blue while the tallest storm tops are shown in yellow.
Video Credits: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce.


On Aug. 20, NOAA’s Central Pacific Hurricane Center or CPHC in Honolulu, Hawaii cautioned “All interests in the Hawaiian Islands, including the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, should continue to closely monitor the progress of Lane this week.  On the current forecast track, a Tropical Storm or Hurricane Watch may be required for parts of Hawaii later today or tonight.”


At 5 a.m. HST/11 a.m. EDT/1500 UTC, the center of Hurricane Lane was located near latitude 13.7 degrees north and longitude 148.2 degrees west.  Lane is moving toward the west near 14 mph (22 kph), and this general motion is expected to continue today.  Lane is forecast to move westward at a slightly slower forward speed from tonight through early Tuesday, followed by a turn toward the west-northwest starting late Tuesday.



GPM core observatory satellite. Image Credits: NASA/JAXA

Maximum sustained winds are near 125 mph (205 kph) with higher gusts.  Lane is a category 3 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.  Little change in strength is expected through early Tuesday, with some weakening possible starting late Tuesday.


CPHC cautioned “Large swells generated by Lane will impact the Hawaiian Islands this week. These swells will likely produce large and dangerous surf, as well as strong currents, along some shorelines.”


For updated forecasts, visit: http://www.prh.noaa.gov/cphc


NASA GPM satellite: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/GPM/main/index.html


JAXA GPM satellite: http://global.jaxa.jp/projects/sat/gpm/


Images (mentioned), Video (mentioned), Text, Credits: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, by Harold F. Pierce/Rob Gutro.


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Vivianite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral Locality: Trepča,…


Vivianite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral


Locality: Trepča, Kosovska Mitrovica, Kosovo

Size: 7.8 × 5.3 × 5.1 cm


Photo Copyright © Viamineralia /e-rocks.com


Geology Page

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Kyanite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral Locality: Kadunguri…


Kyanite | #Geology #GeologyPage #Mineral


Locality: Kadunguri Whiteschists, Zambezi Belt, Mashonaland West, Zimbabwe


Size: 7.3 × 1.4 × 1 cm

Largest Crystal: 7.30cm


Photo Copyright © Wittig Minerals /e-rocks.com


Geology Page

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