пятница, 11 мая 2018 г.

When is the next Blue Moon?

 



Most Blue Moons are not blue in color. This photo of a moon among fast-moving clouds was created using special filters. Image via EarthSky Facebook friend Jv Noriega.


Most Blue Moons are not blue in color. This photo of a moon among fast-moving clouds was created using special filters. Image via EarthSky Facebook friend Jv Noriega.




Moon, Venus, Mars triangle

Tonight – January 31, 2017 – look in a general westward direction after sunset to enjoy a close-knit couple, the moon and Venus. A fainter object, Mars, is also nearby so that these three objects, all neighbors to Earth in orbit around our sun, make a triangle on the sky’s dome. The moon and Venus will pop out into your evening twilight almost immediately after sundown. That’s because they rank as the second-brightest and third-brightest heavenly bodies, respectively, after the sun. As dusk turns into darkness, watch for the planet Mars to appear on the sky’s dome, near the waxing crescent moon and dazzling Venus.


Or, if you have binoculars, try spotting Mars near the moon and Venus before nightfall. Venus shines some 185 times more brilliantly than Mars does at present, explaining why Venus comes out first thing at dusk whereas Mars must wait until dark to make its presence known.




From the world’s Eastern Hemisphere on January 31 – Asia, Australia, and so on – the triangle made by the moon, Venus and Mars appears more stretched out. This January 31, 2017 photo is from Zefri Besar in Brunei Darussalam, a tiny nation on the island of Borneo, surrounded on 2 sides by Malaysia and the South China Sea.




Gorakhgad Trek, Dehri, Murbad, Maharashtra [00:12:43]


Gorakhgad is a small hill which lies in Dehri village in Murbad region of Maharashtra offering a great view of the Sahayadri range of Western Ghats


Music By: Lights & Motion (The Spectacular, Faded Fluorescence, All The Way)


Iron Age stone slab engraved with ancient symbols unearthed in farmer’s field in...



Scientists have been left baffled by an ancient stone slab covered in strange symbols called the ‘stela of Montoro’ after was found in a farmer’s field in Spain.











Iron Age stone slab engraved with ancient symbols unearthed in farmer's field in Spain
The stela, as seen on its side. The scale bar here is 50cm [Credit: Sanjuan et al./Antiquity]

Experts believe the engravings could be the earliest monumental script in Iberia, but no one can decipher what the extinct characters mean.


The artefact is thought to date from the Iron Age and contains elements of Spanish, Greek, Iberian, Canaanite and South Arabian languages.


These cultures were all active in the Iberian Peninsula at the time.


The stela of Montoro is 1.5 metres (4.9 feet) high and 85cm (2.8 feet) wide and the engravings are believed to have been carved between 9th and 3rd century BC according to research published in Antiquity.


It was first unearthed by a farmer ploughing his field in Montoro of southern Spain in 2002 but was dumped at the side of the field.











Iron Age stone slab engraved with ancient symbols unearthed in farmer's field in Spain
The stela of Montoro is 1.5 metres high and 85cm wide and the engravings are believed to have been 
carved between 9th and 3rd century BC [Credit: Sanjuan et al./Antiquity]

Two years later, two rangers noticed the strange markings and took it to the Montoro Archaeological Museum where it stayed for another eight years, the IB Times writes.


In 2012, García Sanjuán from the University of Seville examined the rock and found the symbols came from a variety of different languages.


‘It’s rare to find something like this – the inscriptions on this stela cannot be read. There isn’t a single script that makes sense of them,’ Dr Sanjuán said.


‘They seem to be an assorted collection of graphemes taken from different scripts and put together on this stone,’ he said.


It is not clear why the engravings were first made and there are two main hypotheses.











Iron Age stone slab engraved with ancient symbols unearthed in farmer's field in Spain
The creation of the slab, and the additions of the engravings, over time
[Credit: Sanjuan et al. 2017/Antiquity]

‘What we have here perhaps would be local people – who were very probably illiterate people – replicating on a stone the signs that they have seen of or been told about, which they probably did not understand,’ Dr Sanjuán said.


‘This would reflect very early contact between local people and people from outside Iberia – most likely Phoenicians coming from the eastern Mediterranean.’


Phoenicians are known as the creators of the first alphabet, and inhabited the coastal cities, Tyre, Sidon, Byblos and Arwad, in what is now Lebanon and southern Syria.


Their influence expanded across the Mediterranean and west to the Iberian Peninsula where they established settlements and trading posts.











Iron Age stone slab engraved with ancient symbols unearthed in farmer's field in Spain
The archaeologists excavated a small part of the field where the stela was found – but discovered 
no helpful artefacts to date the stela [Credit: Sanjuan et al./Antiquity]

Alternatively it could have been made during the late Iron Age during the expansion of the Roman Empire.


General Hannibal who led the Carthaginians was established in Iberia during this time and wanted to exploit the gold and silver in the region.


The Romans and Carthaginians had people from different backgrounds fighting for them which could explain why there are so many different characters on the rock.


The Carthaginians were in Iberia from 575 BC to 206 BC – when they were defeated by the Romans.


However, until more artefacts are located the stone will probably remain a mystery. 


‘It must have been very important to the people who made it,’ Dr Sanjuán said.


Author: Phoebe Weston | Source: Daily Mail Online [August 10, 2017]




TANN




https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/iron-age-stone-slab-engraved-with-ancient-symbols-unearthed-in-farmers-field-in-spain/

Ancient Greek papyri virtually unwrapped in Italy



Scientists in Italy continue – with new methods of modern digital technology – the virtual unwrapping and reading of the ancient papyri of Herakleion (Herculaneum) in Campania and, as they announced, made new progress in their very difficult work.











Ancient Greek papyri virtually unwrapped in Italy
Gases and ash from Mount Vesuvius turned the Herculaneum scrolls into carbonized plant material 
[Credit Salvatore Laporta/Associated Press]

The Herculaneum scrolls, many of which concern works by Greek philosophers, were discovered in 1752-54 in archaeological excavations in the so-called Villa of the Papyri in Herakleion (Ercolano in Italian) of Campania in Italy near Pompeii. The villa was destroyed and buried in the ashes after the devastating eruption of Vesuvius, the nearby volcano, in 79 AD.


Today, approximately 1,800 papyruses are kept at the Institute of France in Paris and the National Archaeological Museum in Naples. Essentially this is the only ancient Greek-Roman library that has survived and which was in a small room of the Roman villa. They are the first papyri of Greek script that have been found in archaeological excavations.











Ancient Greek papyri virtually unwrapped in Italy
Lasers are used to measure the shape of the scrolls [Credit: BBC]

After Vesuvius’ eruption, a wave of hot air, which reached 320 degrees Celsius, burned the sensitive papyri and left them charred in a state too vulnerable for the researchers to try to open and read them without seriously risking destroying them. Up to now, archaeologists have attempted to open around 800, but often the project has had devastating or limited results.


But scientists now have alternatives that are less destructive. The physicists at the Institute of Nanotechnology of the Italian National Research Council in Rome, headed by Alessia Cedola and Inna Bukreeva, have announced that – despite the use of appropriate algorithms – they have further improved the advanced X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography (XPCT).











Ancient Greek papyri virtually unwrapped in Italy
Papyrus viewed with multispectral infrared light [Credit: BBC]

They were able to partially “unwrap” two papyri (PHerc 375 and PHerc 495) and begin to read literally their content. Creating initially at the European Synod in Grenoble a tomographic, three-dimensional reconstruction of each papyrus, they could then, with the help of the new specialized software, isolate one by one each successive layer, while on the path to read the letters on the burnt and distorted material.


So far, they have identified 14 rows in Greek letters, more than ever before, some of which have already been read, while others have not. Two Italian papyrologists, who collaborate with the physicists to fully decode the text, believe that it is a work of the epic philosopher and poet Philodemos of the 1st century BC from Gadara.




Scientists hope they will have completed their work by the end of 2017 and by 2018 they will begin digitizing other papyri.


For the first time in 2015, other Italian scientists from the Institute of Microelectronics and Microsystems of the National Research Council in Naples, led by the natural Vito Mocella, had, with the help of the XPCT technique, read – without opening them – a small part of the content of half-damaged folded papyri.


X-ray tomography separates the burnt substrate of papyrus from the letters with black ink, thanks to the subtle but distinct difference with which the two materials (papyrus and ink) refract X-rays. The letters are just 0.1 mm above the surface of the papyrus, but they can be read.


Mocella, who had revealed the first words of the papyri, said the new research of his colleagues is “interesting work,” but he claimed that “it does not make significant progress” in relation to his own 2015 efforts and stated that his own research team has since made consistent progress. The eternal competition continues, but if they end up reading the papyri, it will be worth it.


Source: Tornos News [August 12, 2017]




TANN




https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/ancient-greek-papyri-virtually-unwrapped-in-italy/

Analysis finds defeat of Hannibal ‘written in the coins of the Roman Empire’



Analysis of ancient Roman coins has shown that the defeat of the Carthaginian general Hannibal led to a flood of wealth across the Roman Empire from the silver mines of Spain. This finding, which gives us a tangible record of the transition of Rome from a regional power to an Empire, is presented at the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Paris.











Analysis finds defeat of Hannibal 'written in the coins of the Roman Empire'
The coin in the photo is a denarius, minted by Rome between 108 and 107 BCE. The three red marks denote the sampling locations, where the coin has been drilled at its rim to obtain fresh, unweathered heart metal for the measurements. Analyses indicate that the silver the coin is made of originates from mining districts in the southeastern part of Spain [Credit: Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt]

The Second Punic War, where Hannibal famously marched his elephants across the Alps in a failed attack on Rome, has been regarded as one of the pivotal events of European history. Rome entered the war as the dominant power in Italy, but emerged an empire. The war led to the conquest of the Iberian Peninsula, with the Romans gradually gaining control over the lucrative Spanish silver mines from around 211 B.C. Revenues from the rich Spanish silver mines coupled with booty and extensive war reparations from Carthage, helped fund the expansion of its territory.


Now the application of geochemical analysis techniques has provided proof of the importance of the Spanish silver to the Roman conquest. A group of scientists based in Germany and Denmark and led by Prof Fleur Kemmers and Dr Katrin Westner (Institute for Archaeological Sciences, Goethe University, Frankfurt) analysed 70 Roman coins dating from 310-300 B.C. to 101 B.C., a period which bracketed the Second Punic War. Using Mass Spectrometry, they were able to show that lead in the coins made after 209 B.C. has distinctive isotopic signatures which identified most of the later coins as presumably originating from Spanish sources. The changing origin of the coin bullion is mirrored by differing ratios of the lead isotopes 208Pb, 207Pb, 206Pb and 204Pb, which serve as geological clocks recording the formation age of the ores used to extract the silver. After 209 B.C., the lead isotope signatures mostly correspond to those of deposits in southeast and southwest Spain or to mixtures of metal extracted from these districts.


“Before the war we find that the Roman coins are made of silver from the same sources as the coinage issued by Greek cities in Italy and Sicily. In other words the lead isotope signatures of the coins correspond to those of silver ores and metallurgical products from the Aegean region,” said Katrin Westner. “But the defeat of Carthage led to huge reparation payments to Rome, as well as Rome gaining high amounts of booty and ownership of the rich Spanish silver mines. From 209 B.C. we see that the majority of Roman coins show geochemical signatures typical for Iberian silver.”


“This massive influx of Iberian silver significantly changed Rome’s economy, allowing it to become the superpower of its day. We know this from the histories of Livy and Polybius and others, but our work gives contemporary scientific proof of the rise of Rome. What our work shows is that the defeat of Hannibal and the rise of Rome is written in the coins of the Roman Empire”


Commenting, Professor Kevin Butcher (Department of Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick, UK) said: “This research demonstrates how scientific analysis of ancient coins can make a significant contribution to historical research. It allows what was previously speculation about the importance of Spanish silver for the coinage of Rome to be placed on a firm foundation.”


Source: Goldschmidt Conference [August 14, 2017]




TANN




https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/analysis-finds-defeat-of-hannibal-written-in-the-coins-of-the-roman-empire/

met-greekroman-art: Gold eye-shaped pendant with three tassels,…


met-greekroman-art:



Gold eye-shaped pendant with three tassels, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Gold


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/242756



https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/met-greekroman-art-gold-eye-shaped-pendant-with-three-tassels/

Limestone head of a beardless male with a diadem, Greek and…


Limestone head of a beardless male with a diadem, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Limestone


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/242095


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/limestone-head-of-a-beardless-male-with-a-diadem-greek-and/

Terracotta statuette of a standing girl, Greek and Roman…


Terracotta statuette of a standing girl, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


Rogers Fund, 1919

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/250741


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/terracotta-statuette-of-a-standing-girl-greek-and-roman/

Bronze statuette of a Scythian mounted archer, Greek and Roman…


Bronze statuette of a Scythian mounted archer, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Bronze


Gift of Norbert Schimmel Trust, 1989

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/255955


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/bronze-statuette-of-a-scythian-mounted-archer-greek-and-roman/

Terracotta statuette of a female figure, Greek and Roman…


Terracotta statuette of a female figure, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


Gift of the Archaeological Institute of America, 1953

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/254750


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/terracotta-statuette-of-a-female-figure-greek-and-roman/

met-greekroman-art: Terracotta globular bottle with two…


met-greekroman-art:



Terracotta globular bottle with two handles, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/240653



https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/met-greekroman-art-terracotta-globular-bottle-with-two/

Marble grave stele with a family group, Greek and Roman…


Marble grave stele with a family group, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Marble, Pentelic


Rogers Fund, 1911

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/248483


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/marble-grave-stele-with-a-family-group-greek-and-roman/

met-greekroman-art: Terracotta antefix with lion’s head, Greek…


met-greekroman-art:



Terracotta antefix with lion’s head, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


Gift of a friend of the Museum, 1992

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/256128



https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/met-greekroman-art-terracotta-antefix-with-lions-head-greek/

Earring-hook type with discs of thin foil, Greek and Roman…


Earring-hook type with discs of thin foil, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Gold


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/243415


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/earring-hook-type-with-discs-of-thin-foil-greek-and-roman/

Glass beaker with facet-cut decoration, Greek and Roman…


Glass beaker with facet-cut decoration, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Glass


Edward C. Moore Collection, Bequest of Edward C. Moore, 1891

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/245730


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/glass-beaker-with-facet-cut-decoration-greek-and-roman/

Bronze statuette of Hermes seated on a rock, Greek and Roman…


Bronze statuette of Hermes seated on a rock, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Bronze


Rogers Fund, 1920

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/250955


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/bronze-statuette-of-hermes-seated-on-a-rock-greek-and-roman/

Limestone model of chariot drawn by two horses, Greek and Roman…


Limestone model of chariot drawn by two horses, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Limestone


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/242238


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/limestone-model-of-chariot-drawn-by-two-horses-greek-and-roman/

Terracotta oinochoe: chous (jug) by Meidias Painter, Greek and…


Terracotta oinochoe: chous (jug) by Meidias Painter, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


Gift of Samuel G. Ward, 1875

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/244817


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/terracotta-oinochoe-chous-jug-by-meidias-painter-greek-and/

Glass flask in the shape of a pine cone, Greek and Roman…


Glass flask in the shape of a pine cone, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Glass


Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/249486


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/glass-flask-in-the-shape-of-a-pine-cone-greek-and-roman/

Painted limestone funerary stele with a seated man and two…


Painted limestone funerary stele with a seated man and two standing figures, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Limestone, paint


Gift of Darius Ogden Mills, 1904

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/247107


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/painted-limestone-funerary-stele-with-a-seated-man-and-two/

met-greekroman-art: Gold earring with head of an animal, Greek…


met-greekroman-art:



Gold earring with head of an animal, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Gold


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/242868



https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/met-greekroman-art-gold-earring-with-head-of-an-animal-greek/

Terracotta rim fragment with cross-hatching, Greek and Roman…


Terracotta rim fragment with cross-hatching, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


Gift of the American Exploration Society, 1907

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/247686


https://xissufotoday.space/2017/08/terracotta-rim-fragment-with-cross-hatching-greek-and-roman/

Priceless Ancient Seed Bank Saved from Destruction in Syria


Could you imagine what a disaster it would be if the 140,000 packets of seeds in the ICARDA seed bank, some dating back an incredible 10,000 years, were destroyed in Aleppo’s carnage? Thankfully, a team of scientists moved rapidly to get the priceless seeds out of the country before they ended up in the rubble.


Read more…


Source Ancient Origins All about archaeology, human evolution, mythologies and legends from all around the world.


ancientart: Roman coins found during excavations on the site of…







ancientart:



Roman coins found during excavations on the site of the former County Hospital, Dorchester, England.


Shown 1st is a reverse of Julia Mamaea (222-235 AD), the 2nd is a reverse of a Valentinian II coin showing Victory walking with a wreath in her hand, and the 3rd, Allectus 293-296/7 AD. Next is Carausius 286-293 AD, Vespasian 69-79 AD, and the final coin is a reverse of Nummus of Flavius Victor (387-388 AD). The mintmark on this coin is for Trier, and it is of the Spes Romanorum type, depicting a camp gate.


All coins courtesy of Wessex Archaeology, check out here for more information on the Dorchester Hospital excavations.



A lighter week this week and next, because I have applications due in early February. Sorry, everyone.


A collection of images and articles about coins from the ancient (and especially Mediterranean) world


Bright meteor over France January 29, 2016

On January 29 observation station filmed a large meteor which was visible for several seconds.


Meteor recorded

View  the city Fleville-devant-Nancy, video below





Meteore 29/01/2017 17:36:48 TU


Beau meteore au travers des nuages le 29/01/2017 à 17:36:48 TU (18:36:48 Heure Locale) : enregistré depuis Fleville-devan-Nancy (54) direction SSO


Posted by BOAM on Monday, January 30, 2017



Beau meteore au travers des nuages le 29/01/2017 à 17:36:48 TU (18:36:48 Heure Locale) : enregistré depuis Fleville-devan-Nancy (54) direction SSO


Source Base des Observateurs Amateurs de Météores – Réseau français de caméra d’observation du ciel pour l’étude des étoiles filantes et bolides




ahencyclopedia: GODS AND GODDESSES OF THE ANCIENT WORLD: Assur…




ahencyclopedia:




GODS AND GODDESSES OF THE ANCIENT WORLD: Assur (God of the Assyrians) 



ASSUR (also Ashur, Anshar) is the god of the Assyrians who was elevated from a local deity of the city of Ashur to the supreme god of the Assyrian pantheon. The Assyrian Empire, like the later empire of the Romans, had a great talent for borrowing from other cultures. This penchant is illustrated clearly in the figure of Assur whose character and attributes draw on the Sumerian and Babylonian gods.


Assur’s family and history are modeled on the Sumerian Anu and Enlil and the Babylonian Marduk; his power and attributes mirror Anu’s, Enlil’s, and Marduk’s as do details of his family: Assur’s wife is Ninlil (Enlil’s wife) and his son is Nabu (Marduk’s son). Assur had no actual history of his own, such as those created for Sumerian and Babylonian gods but borrowed from these other myths to create a supreme deity whose worship, at its height, was almost monotheistic.


Read More 




Article by Joshua J. Mark || Photos © by Osama S.M. Amin & The Trustees of the British Museum on AHE




Via Archaeology Blog dedicated to the greatest ancient culture – Mesopotamia.


Space Archaeology: The Next Frontier of Exploration

A technology-wielding archaeologist billed as a real-world “Indiana Jones” on Monday launched an online platform that lets anyone help discover archaeological wonders and fight looting.











Space Archaeology: The Next Frontier of Exploration
Archaeologist Sarah Parcak has launched an online platform that lets anyone help discover archaeological wonders 

and fight looting [Credit: National Geographic]

A “citizen science” platform that space archaeologist Sarah Parcak wished for a year ago as part of a coveted TED prize went live at GlobalXplorer.org .


“The world’s hidden heritage contains clues to humankind’s collective resilience and creativity,” Parcak said in a release.


“With GlobalXplorer we are empowering a 21st century army of global explorers to discover and protect our shared history.”


A video of Parcak unveiling the wish was posted online Monday at ted.com.


GlobalXplorer blends satellite imagery with pattern-hunting of a sort to make a game of spotting clues to the whereabouts of antiquities or looting.











Space Archaeology: The Next Frontier of Exploration
The project’s first online “expedition” focuses on Peru. Participants view satellite images of the country’s landscape and 

learn about its cultures and explorers. Design by MONDO ROBOT [Credit: National Geographic]

Visitors to the website are invited to sign in and take a quick tutorial before virtually hunting relics and thieves.


Spending time scrutinizing satellite imagery lets people “level up” as in video games and earn rewards such as a chance to virtually join archaeologists on actual digs.


“Parcak’s wish has put the tools in everyone’s hands to discover and protect humanity’s rich history, effectively opening up a traditionally closed discipline,” said TED prize director Anna Verghese.


“Now our stories are safeguarded by millions rather than just a handful.”


Eye on Peru


Only tiny sections of imagery are shown, along with broad location data such as what country is involved, to avoid being a resource for looters seeking tips of where to search.


DigitalGlobe, which specializes in capturing high-resolution pictures of the Earth from space, said that it provided more than 200,000 square kilometers of satellite imagery of Peru and a customized version of an online crowdsourcing tool.


National Geographic and Sustainable Preservation Initiative were listed among collaborators on the project.


Archaeologists will follow up on sites pinpointed by the “crowd,” paving the way for protection from governments or law enforcement agencies


“As soon as they see new or destroyed sites from space, we will be there on the ground to investigate and protect them,” said SPI founder and executive director Larry Coben.


Sarah Parcak envisions a 21st century army of citizen scientists discovering and defending relics.


Parcak condemned destruction of antiquities by the likes of violent extremists from the Islamic State group and saw looting done by the desperately poor as “heartbreaking.”











Space Archaeology: The Next Frontier of Exploration
A satellite image from high above Peru reveals the outline of a stone structure surrounded by what may 

be a defensive wall [Credit: © DigitalGlobe 2017]

The TED Prize provides a million dollars to kickstart a big vision and opens a door to call on the nonprofit organization’s innovative, influential and ingenious community of “tedsters” for help.


The TED community includes scientists, celebrities, politicians, artists, and entrepreneurs.


Her work has caused some to refer to Parcak as a real-world version of the Indiana Jones character made famous in films starring Harrison Ford.


Parcak is a professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she founded the Laboratory for Global Observation.


She has won attention for her work satellite mapping Egypt and uncovering hidden pyramids, tombs and settlements.


The annual TED Prize has grown from $100,000 to a million dollars since it was first awarded in the year 2005, to U2 band leader Bono and his vision of fighting poverty and disease.


Since its inception in 1984, TED has grown into a global forum for “ideas worth spreading” and has won a worldwide following for trademark “talks” during which accomplished speakers deliver thought-sparking presentations.


Author: Glenn Chapman | Source: AFP [January 30, 2017]




Source TheArchaeologyNewsNetwork


Top 4 keys to mastering moon phases

 



The location of the sun with respect to the moon determines the moon phase in your night sky. Image via Ask.com


Artist’s concept of the moon, Earth and sun aligned in space. Image via Ask.com



Why does the moon seem to change its shape every night? Why can I see the moon in the daytime?


Руны Знаки Рисунки


СУАСТИКА


СУ Рука Ладонь

уАС АС Ладонь Аса гиганта бессмертного

буква V  Руна движения вверх


 СУVАСТИКА руны создающие лучи энергии ладонями АСА



СуАСтика  или сvАСтика была целительно охраняющей, оберегом сказочным.


Даже бойцы в годы ВеликойОтечественнойВойны носили её на своих рубахах. Мой дедуля Расен россиянин её пронёс через всю войну и дошёл до Берлина и даже чудесным образом телепортировался из зоны уничтожения_окружения, но правда со смертельными ранениями и тем не менее быстро исцелился и дожил до 84 леѣ.




 конец 19 в, Олонецкая губ.


Свастика была целительно охраняющей, оберегом сказочным. Даже бойцы в годы ВеликойОтечественнойВойны носили её на своих рубахах. Мой дедуля Расен россиянин её пронёс через всю войну и дошёл до Берлина и даже чудесным образом телепортировался из зоны уничтожения_окружения, но правда со смертельными ранениями и тем не менее быстро исцелился и дожил до 84 леѣ.  Свастика на женской рубахе  конец 19 в, Олонецкая губ.




К вопросу о подделках в области названий славянских знаков

Ещё бы дополнили о подделке Рунических образов, расшифровки толкования значения рун. Интересно было бы почитать мнение Мыслителя 😊


Из видеобеседы со зрителем Александром С.  , когда Саша С. чертил руками в воздухе, рассказывая о некоторых Рунах,

у меня появился до_мысел,

Домысел это состояние До Мысли, но ещё не сама осознанная, продуманная Мысль.




а что если Руны на самом деле, созданы Катарами, Расенами, Русенами, Русами в момент эмоционального напряжения, в момент Радости или страха,

Так Руны созданы были и Силу имели, как артефакт тела,




но сумервы позже обезобразили образ,

исказили азбуку расшифровки, свели в иллюзию,






 в современности славянские символы Руны утратили Силу  управления_влияния

Силы нет в Рунах славянской современности.

но зато смертельной силой наполнены руны Сумерв

и служат против человека

Восклицательный знак





На древнеславянском языке этрусский язык, на котором говорила вся Европа, тот самый хохляцкий украинский язык Расена Русена  Боль Галицкой Руси

В нашем общем, когда-то в древности языке, не было руны Смерти.

Как смерти не было вообще у нашего предка Гиганта АСа. У потомков АСа гиганта, ещё на момент конца 19 века, когда пытали и мертвили Катар за инакомыслие в 18в., тело маленького человека могло выдержать более 11 пыток в день и не умирало, а очень быстро регенерировалось.

Отсюда так называемые святые мученики появились в жуткой и жестокой религии растерзания на мелкие частички мертвой плоти. На самом деле это были Катары, но инквизиторы, поражённые быстрым и чудесным восстановлением за ночь истерзанного на орудиях пытки тела, исказили саму суть стойкости Катар, замученных казненных ими людей.


Позже, всех на планете обязали использовать восклицания знак на всех языках, как знак приветствия при обращении.



Даже в церковнославянском писании нет знака восклицания.




требник Петра Могилы


Но почемуто в правилах его использования, оставили следующее 

Знак восклицания ! использовать только один раз, при обращении к Личности или группе лиц, а вот дальнейшее, когда ! ставится в последующих за обращением предложениях, понимать как недовольство, восклицательную агрессию.


Поэтому лучше этот знак совсем не использовать, если конечно хотите остаться в Добре и Благополучии.


! смертельная Руна, бьющая не по тому, кому пишете рисуете на письме, а бьете убиваете Ваши клеточки. Самоликвидируется убивается пишущий, кто рисует ! на письме для кого-то, кому пишет.


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