суббота, 14 октября 2017 г.

Steatite scaraboid seal, Greek and Roman ArtMedium:…


Steatite scaraboid seal, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Steatite


Bequest of Richard B. Seager, 1926

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/251998


by Fan Hong

by Fan Hong


met-drawings-prints: Woman with Shield Seated on Seamonster by…


met-drawings-prints:



Woman with Shield Seated on Seamonster by Francesco Angeloni, Drawings and Prints


Medium: Engraving. Third state.


The Elisha Whittelsey Collection, The Elisha Whittelsey Fund, 1949

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/371862



met-robert-lehman: Christ by Haly workshop, Robert Lehman…


met-robert-lehman:



Christ by Haly workshop, Robert Lehman Collection


Medium: Opaque white, brown, pink, blue, yellow, green, greenish brown, and waxlike colorless glass; copper and iron wire. Lampworked.


Robert Lehman Collection, 1975

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/461707



Dirhem, Ancient Near Eastern ArtMedium: SilverRogers Fund,…


Dirhem, Ancient Near Eastern Art


Medium: Silver


Rogers Fund, 1936

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/323481


met-cloisters: Saint Martin and the Brigands, The…


met-cloisters:



Saint Martin and the Brigands, The Cloisters


Medium: Silk and metal thread on linen


The Cloisters Collection, 1947

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/468240



met-european-sculpture: Collar and cuffs, European Sculpture…


met-european-sculpture:



Collar and cuffs, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts


Medium: Bobbin and needle lace


Gift of Mrs. Edward S. Harkness, 1930

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/222460



met-islamic-art: “Sgraffito-ware” Bowl, Islamic ArtMedium: Red…


met-islamic-art:



“Sgraffito-ware” Bowl, Islamic Art


Medium: Red earthenware; white slip-covered with incised and brown slip decoration under polychrome transparent glazes


Purchase, V. Everit Macy Gift, 1930

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/455006



Towers of lightThis image of the Aurora Borealis over Canada was…


Towers of light


This image of the Aurora Borealis over Canada was taken out the window of the International Space Station in September during one of the large solar outbursts that month. The aurora is produced by interaction between charged particles fired out of the sun and the Earth’s atmosphere. When charged particles from the sun hit the Earth’s magnetic field, they are travel along the magnetic field lines and hit the atmosphere, usually near the poles. The collisions between these charged particles and molecules of nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere transfers energy to those atoms and when they release that energy, it appears to us as visible light. The green colors come from energy being released from oxygen while the purple colors come from energy released by nitrogen, often at different heights in the atmosphere. In the distance you can see the light marking the beginning of sunrise that day.


-JBB


Image credit: NASA
https://www.nasa.gov/image-feature/northern-lights-over-canada-0


Seljalandsfoss waterfall in Iceland





Seljalandsfoss waterfall in Iceland


natgeotravel Video by @renan_ozturk // A glimpse of the UNESCO…






  • natgeotravel Video by @renan_ozturk // A glimpse of the UNESCO world heritage site Metéora (meaning ‘suspended in air’) in Northern Greece, captured with @taylorfreesolo. ~

    There are over a hundred towers of conglomerate grey rock here, an ancient sea bed thrust upward and calved off in these sheer forms, hundreds of feet high. Some experts posit this could have been the site of the earliest technical rock climbing, possibly dating back to the 9th or 10th century. Later in the 11th century, the Eastern Orthodox monasteries were built on some of the summits and are still thriving religious communities and tourism sites, seeing tens of thousands of visitors a year. ~


    From talking to the local climbers there seems to be a bit of a conflict between the climbers and the monks. The monks feel the climbers scar the rock with bolts (there aren’t many, I can attest!) and also threaten the religious tourism, but the climbers feel wrongly accused of harming the rock compared to the construction of the monasteries. The budding adventure sports community sees the positive growth potential that climbing and high-lining would bring to the area, encouraging even more people to visit the religious sites on their rest days between climbs. Having experienced both worlds for a few days, I was equally spellbound by the bold achievements all around!



met-american-painting: William Cross, American Paintings and…


met-american-painting:



William Cross, American Paintings and Sculpture


Medium: Watercolor on ivory in gilded copper case; opalescent glass over foil verso


Fletcher Fund, 2006

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/15248



How Scientists Used NASA Data to Predict the Corona of the Aug. 21 Total Solar Eclipse




NASA & ESA – SOHO Mission patch / NASA – STEREO Mission logo / NASA – Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) patch.


Oct. 14, 2017


When the total solar eclipse swept across the United States on Aug. 21, 2017, NASA satellites captured a diverse set of images from space. But days before the eclipse, some NASA satellites also enabled scientists to predict what the corona — the Sun’s outer atmosphere — would look like during the eclipse, from the ground. In addition to offering a case study to test our predictive abilities, the predictions also enabled some eclipse scientists to choose their study targets in advance.



Animation of comparison of the model’s predictions to a photo taken the day of the total eclipse. Animation Credits: Predictive Science, Inc./Paul Holdorf/Joy Ng.


Predictive Science, Inc., San Diego, Calif. — a private computational physics research company supported by NASA, the National Science Foundation and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research — used data from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, to develop an improved numerical model that simulated what the corona would look like during the total eclipse. Their model uses observations of magnetic fields on the Sun’s surface and requires a wealth of supercomputing resources to predict how the magnetic field shapes the corona over time. 


As the corona and solar material spread outward from the Sun, they can manifest themselves as disturbances in near-Earth space, known as space weather. “Space weather models must be able to characterize the structure of the corona in order to improve forecasts of the path and possible impacts of these events,” Predictive Science president and scientist Jon Linker said.


One key tool are computer models that simulate events on the Sun before they even happen. This comparing of models and observations is a core aspect of heliophysics — the field of science dedicated to understanding the Sun and its dynamic influence throughout the solar system. Without the ability to measure the corona directly, heliophysicists test their theories by using complex computer simulations.



Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Image Credit: NASA

Eclipses offer a unique opportunity for scientists to test such models. During the total eclipse, the Moon completely obscured the Sun’s bright face, revealing the innermost part of the corona — the region where solar eruptions such as coronal mass ejections originate, but is difficult to observe under ordinary circumstances. By comparing their predictions to the observations gathered during the eclipse itself, researchers can assess and improve the performance of their coronal models.


The model the Predictive Science researchers used for their final prediction of the August 2017 eclipse was their most complex yet. In addition to SDO’s maps of the Sun’s magnetic field, it also utilized SDO observations of filaments — serpentine structures on the Sun’s surface comprised of cool, dense solar material.


Greater complexity demands more computing hours, and each simulation required thousands of processers and took about two days of real time to complete. The research group ran their model on several supercomputers including facilities at the Texas Advanced Computer Center in Austin, Texas; the San Diego Supercomputer Center in California; and the Pleiades supercomputer at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California.




Images above: Predictive Science, Inc. developed a numerical model that simulated what the corona would look like during the Aug. 21, 2017 total solar eclipse. Comparison of the model’s predictions (above) to a photo taken the day of the total eclipse (below). Images Credits: Predictive Science, Inc./Paul Holdorf/Joy Ng.


“Based on a very preliminary comparison, it looks like the model did very well in capturing features of the large-scale corona,” Linker said. In its increased complexity, the model demonstrates that even the Sun’s fine magnetic structures are intimately related to the vast structure of the corona.



STEREO’s spacecrafts. Image Credit: NASA

While scientists were running their models, NASA’s own Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory, or STEREO-A spacecraft, was also able to peer into the future and provide clues as to what the corona would look like the day of the eclipse. As the eclipse drew closer, due to STEREO-A’s position behind the Sun and the particular rotation rates of the Sun and Earth, STEREO-A’s view of the corona on Aug. 12, 2017, was virtually the same those within the path of totality would see nine days later on Aug. 21. That is, STEREO-A’s vantage point is roughly nine days in advance of Earth’s.


STEREO’s key instruments include a pair of coronagraphs — telescopes that use a metal disk called an occulting disk to study the corona. Just like a total eclipse, the occulting disk blocks the Sun’s bright light, making it possible to discern the surrounding corona.




Images above: Due to NASA’s STEREO-A’s position behind the Sun and the particular rotation rates of the Sun and Earth, STEREO-A’s view of the corona on Aug. 12, 2017, was virtually the same those within the path of totality would see nine days later on Aug. 21. Comparison of STEREO-A’s eclipse prediction (above) to observations from ESA/NASA’s SOHO (Below) — which was positioned to share Earth’s view of the corona — the day of the total eclipse. Images Credits: NASA/ESA/Goddard/STEREO/SOHO/Joy Ng.


Coronagraph images from Aug. 12 and 21 show great similarity; both feature a dominant three-streamer shape. Here, the STEREO image is compared to an image from the joint ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO, which was positioned to share Earth’s view of the corona on Aug. 21. The slight difference in the location of the streamers is due to the fact that STEREO-A and SOHO view the Sun from slightly different angles.



Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Image Credits: NASA/ESA

“The small difference between the Aug. 12 and Aug. 21 images show the Sun’s atmosphere evolves very slowly — as we expect it to, in its declining phase toward solar minimum,” said Angelos Vourlidas, a STEREO science team member and heliophysicist at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. “The Sun is slowly going to sleep — but not quietly, as the recent spate of solar activity reminded us!”


Solar minimum is the period of lower solar activity in the Sun’s natural approximately 11-year cycle. In times of greater solar activity, the dynamic corona could have evolved too quickly to make such a prediction useful. But in these times nearing solar minimum, both Predictive Science and STEREO’s eclipse predictions offered an opportunity for researchers to improve models and our understanding of the Sun’s current activity.


Related links:


Predictive Science’s Coronal Prediction for the Total Solar Eclipse: http://www.predsci.com/corona/aug2017eclipse/home.php


Studying the Sun’s Atmosphere with the Total Solar Eclipse of 2017: https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/studying-the-sun-s-atmosphere-with-the-total-solar-eclipse-of-2017/


How to Read a STEREO Image: http://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2016/how-to-read-a-stereo-image/


Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO): http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/main/index.html


Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO): https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/soho/overview/index.html


Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO): https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/stereo/mission/index.html


Predictive Science, Inc.: http://www.predsci.com/portal/about.php


Animation (mentioned), Images (mentioned), Text, Credits: NASA/Karl Hille/Goddard Space Flight Center, by Lina Tran.


Greetings, Orbiter.ch


A Hybrid Solar Eclipse over Kenya | APOD Image Credit &…


A Hybrid Solar Eclipse over Kenya | APOD
Image Credit & Copyright: Eugen Kamenew

(Kamenew Photography)


Chasing solar eclipses can cause you to go to the most interesting places and meet the most interesting people. Almost. For example, chasing this eclipse brought this astrophotographer to Kenya in 2013. His contact, a member of the Maasai people, was to pick him up at the airport, show him part of southern Kenya, and even agreed to pose in traditional warrior garb on a hill as the hopefully spectacular eclipse set far in background. Unfortunately, this contact person died unexpectedly a week before the astrophotographer’s arrival, and so he never got to participate in the shoot, nor know that the resulting image went on to win an international award for astrophotography. Pictured in 2013 from Kenya, the Moon covers much of the Sun during a hybrid eclipse, a rare type of solar eclipse that appears as total from some Earth locations, but annular in others. During the annular part of the eclipse, the Moon was too far from the Earth to block the entire Sun. Next month a total solar eclipse will cross the USA.


Scientists develop potentially therapeutic gel, which detects…


Scientists develop potentially therapeutic gel, which detects nitric oxide, absorbs excess fluids and delivers drugs



IBS scientists at the Center for Self-Assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), invented a hydrogel to fight rheumatoid arthritis and other diseases. Published in Advanced Materials, this jelly-like material could be used to absorb extra fluids in swelling joints and release drugs.


Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a long-term disease that causes inflammation and deformity of the joints, and affects about 1 percent of the world population. In this autoimmune condition, the body’s immune system attacks the soft tissue of the joints, leading to an accumulation of synovial fluid. While this clear fluid lubricates and nourishes the joints, its excess causes swelling and pain.


Immune cells at the inflamed joints are the predominant source of nitric oxide (NO), a gas with various physiological functions. “Nitric oxide is like a double-edge sword. It regulates inflammation and protects our body by killing external pathogens. However, when in excess, it is toxic and may cause RA, as well as other autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer,” explains the group leader, KIM Won Jong. Current RA treatments are based on anti-inflammatory drugs that relieve pain and inflammation, but IBS scientists tried a more challenging approach by targeting NO itself. NO is a transient gas, which stays in circulation for less than 10 seconds, before binding to other molecules.



Read more.


Gold necklace, Greek and Roman ArtMedium: GoldThe Cesnola…


Gold necklace, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Gold


The Cesnola Collection, Purchased by subscription, 1874–76

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/242438


Figure, Ancient Near Eastern ArtMedium: BoneRogers Fund,…


Figure, Ancient Near Eastern Art


Medium: Bone


Rogers Fund, 1959

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/324897


Bead, Egyptian ArtMedium: CarnelianRogers Fund,…


Bead, Egyptian Art


Medium: Carnelian


Rogers Fund, 1909

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/639393


met-armsarmor: Pair of Wheellock Pistols by François Du Clos,…


met-armsarmor:



Pair of Wheellock Pistols by François Du Clos, Arms and Armor


Medium: Steel, gold, brass, wood, silver, mother-of-pearl


Rogers Fund, 1904

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/21927



Off to War (Henderson Ledger Artist B) by Frank Henderson, Arts…


Off to War (Henderson Ledger Artist B) by Frank Henderson, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas


Medium: Pencil, colored pencil, and ink on paper


Gift of Charles and Valerie Diker, 1999

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/318361


Queen Mother Pendant Mask: Iyoba, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and…


Queen Mother Pendant Mask: Iyoba, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas


Medium: Ivory, iron, copper (?)


The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Gift of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1972

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/318622


Double Spouted Miniature Silver Vessel, Arts of Africa, Oceania,…


Double Spouted Miniature Silver Vessel, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas


Medium: Silver


Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Cummings, 1964

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/308741


Pair of Miquelet Flintlock Pistols, Arms and ArmorMedium: Steel,…


Pair of Miquelet Flintlock Pistols, Arms and Armor


Medium: Steel, wood, brass


Gift of Charles M. Schott Jr., 1917

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/22731


2017 October 14 All-Sky Steve Image Credit & Copyright: …


2017 October 14


All-Sky Steve
Image Credit & Copyright: Alan Dyer, Amazingsky.com, TWAN


Explanation: Familiar green and red tinted auroral emission floods the sky along the northern (top) horizon in this fish-eye panorama projection from September 27. On the mild, clear evening the Milky Way tracks through the zenith of a southern Alberta sky and ends where the six-day-old Moon sets in the southwest. The odd, isolated, pink and whitish arc across the south has come to be known as Steve. The name was given to the phenomenon by the Alberta Aurora Chasers Facebook group who had recorded appearances of the aurora-like feature. Sometimes mistakenly identified as a proton aurora or proton arc, the mysterious Steve arcs seem associated with aurorae but appear closer to the equator than the auroral curtains. Widely documented by citizen scientists and recently directly explored by a Swarm mission satellite, Steve arcs have been measured as thermal emission from flowing gas rather than emission excited by energetic electrons. Even though a reverse-engineered acronym that fits the originally friendly name is Sudden Thermal Emission from Velocity Enhancement, his origin is still mysterious.


∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap171014.html


yourheartisbeating:Rogie Falls | Scotland


yourheartisbeating:



Rogie Falls | Scotland



Fossil BryozoansThese flat layers with a “netting” like fabric…


Fossil Bryozoans


These flat layers with a “netting” like fabric are fossil organisms called bryozoans. They are the remnants of encrusting organisms that form colonies. Individual organisms called zooids live in this structure as a colony, with different organisms performing different roles including reproduction and feeding. The feeding organisms extend tiny appendages called cilia that they use to drive passing food into their mouths. These are extremely common fossils in the geologic record, and they are often found as flat layers on top of or encrusting other shells.


-JBB


Image credit:
https://flic.kr/p/iRJg1c


Reference:
http://www.kgs.ku.edu/Extension/fossils/bryozoan.html


erubes1:Push me to the edge Follow me: www.instagram.com/erubes1


erubes1:



Push me to the edge

Follow me: www.instagram.com/erubes1



met-european-paintings: The Musician by Bartholomeus van der…


met-european-paintings:



The Musician by Bartholomeus van der Helst, European Paintings


Medium: Oil on canvas


Purchase, 1873

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436642



Ask Ethan: Is The Universe Finite Or Infinite? “What I’d…











Ask Ethan: Is The Universe Finite Or Infinite?



“What I’d like to see discussed whether the universe is finite or infinite, and why it might be either. I’ve seen some limited discussion by [Sean Carroll] and [Lisa] Randall to the effect it could be either. We just don’t know.”



When it comes to the ultimate question of the size of the Universe, we have to look to greater scales than what we can possibly observe. Although we can place constraints on how big the unobservable Universe must be, coming up with a lower limit to its overall size, there’s a bigger question that we don’t yet know the answer to: is it finite in size, or is it truly infinite? Beyond what we can see, there ought to be more Universe just like our own, originating from either the same Big Bang, or possibly, if inflation is correct, from other Big Bangs at later or earlier times. And thanks to the ideas of eternal inflation, we have very, very large numbers for what’s possible as far as size goes. But there’s a long way from very large to infinite, and determining whether that’s true is a very difficult prospect.


So what can we say about the conditions under which the Universe is either finite or infinite in extent? Find out on this week’s Ask Ethan!


Cargo Mission Launches Carrying Food, Fuel and Supplies to Station


ROSCOSMOS – Russian Vehicles patch.


October 14, 2017



Image above: The Russian Progress 68 cargo craft lifts off from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Image Credit: NASA TV.


Carrying almost three tons of food, fuel, and supplies for the International Space Station crew, the unpiloted Russian Progress 68 cargo spacecraft launched at 4:46 a.m. EDT (2:46 p.m. local time in Baikonur) from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.


At the time of launch, the International Space Station was flying about 250 miles over the south Atlantic Ocean north of the Falkland Islands.



Russian Cargo Craft Launches for Journey to International Space Station

Less than 10 minutes after launch, the resupply ship reached preliminary orbit and deployed its solar arrays and navigational antennas as planned. The Expedition 53 crew will monitor key events during Progress 68’s approach and docking.


Following a 34-orbit, two-day trip, Progress will arrive at the Pirs docking compartment of the International Space Station for docking on Monday, Oct. 16, at 7:09 a.m. NASA TV coverage of rendezvous and docking will begin on NASA’s website at 6:15 a.m.


Related links:


NASA’s website: http://www.nasa.gov/live


Roscosmos: http://en.roscosmos.ru/


Expedition 53: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition53/index.html


Space Station Research and Technology: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html


International Space Station (ISS): https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html


Image (mentioned), Video, Text, Credits: NASA/Roscosmos/Mark Garcia.


Best regards, Orbiter.ch


Turquoise Dish with Carved Arabic Inscription in Floriated Kufic…


Turquoise Dish with Carved Arabic Inscription in Floriated Kufic Reading “al-‘izz” (“Glory”), Islamic Art


Medium: Stonepaste; carved and glazed


H. O. Havemeyer Collection, Gift of Horace Havemeyer, 1929

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/448266


Fragment of a terracotta plate, Greek and Roman ArtMedium:…


Fragment of a terracotta plate, Greek and Roman Art


Medium: Terracotta


Gift of Nicolas Koutoulakis, 1960

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/255081


Stamp Seal Inscribed for the God’s Wife Nefertari,…


Stamp Seal Inscribed for the God’s Wife Nefertari, Egyptian Art


Medium: Steatite, glazed


Gift of Helen Miller Gould, 1910

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/548854


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