пятница, 29 сентября 2017 г.

Experiments simultaneously detect gravitational waves – and help open up a new era of astronomy

Experiments simultaneously detect gravitational waves – and help open up a new era of astronomy

by Ed Daw



The detection of gravitational waves – ripples in the fabric of space itself – by the LIGO collaboration last year has been hailed as one of the most groundbreaking discoveries of the century. Now three detectors as part of two different experiments in the US and Italy have simultaneously detected another such burst.


Telemedicine via satellite improves care at astronaut landings

Telemedicine via satellite improves care at astronaut landings

ESA – European Astronauts patch.


29 September 2017


Tempus Pro, a portable vital-signs monitor offering telemedicine via satellite, is helping medics at ESA astronaut landings. Thomas Pesquet was the first to benefit at the end of his mission in May.


Astronauts returning from space must readjust to life on Earth. Gravity influences the body’s balance, cardiovascular functions, and especially the muscles, so astronauts are carefully monitored as soon as they are out of their reentry capsule.



Health check for Thomas Pesquet using Tempus Pro

When Thomas landed in Kazakhstan from his mission on the International Space Station, ESA medical staff stood by with the Tempus Pro.


As he was feeling gravity for the first time in six months, several sensors were attached to his body and connected to the device to gather important medical information.


This was repeated in the medical tent, during the helicopter ride back to Karaganda in Kazakhstan and on the aircraft back to Cologne in Germany, to allow doctors to detect any changes in his condition.


“In the challenging environment of an astronaut landing, Tempus Pro allowed us to track and log medical information quickly and easily and to share this in real time with our medical colleagues at ESA’s European Astronaut Centre in Cologne,” commented Sergi Vaquer, ESA’s flight surgeon.


The secured satellite link with the astronaut centre required a portable satellite antenna connected to the unit.


Medical teams at both sites examined advanced information containing Thomas’ vital signs such as blood oxygen level, blood pressure and heart activity, ultrasound images, realtime videos, pictures and voice.


All data were recorded in an encrypted patient record on the device for further evaluation at the centre.



Tempus Pro transmits data via satellite

Sharing information between teams in real time ensures the best possible outcome in the event of a medical emergency during landing operations. Working together increases accuracy and speed of diagnosis and treatment. It also enables a more coordinated and effective emergency response.


An improved version of the Tempus Pro, based on lessons learned, will be used in December when ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli returns from the Space Station.


“The next challenge will be to send data from the Tempus Pro via satellite to medical teams on the ground from the aircraft transporting an ESA astronaut back to Cologne,” commented Arnaud Runge, ESA’s project manager. 


Remote Diagnostic Technologies of the UK developed the device with funding and support from the Business Applications part of ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems programme, which helps European industry to use space to create commercial applications in non-space sectors.


Tempus is a fully medically approved product that is used by airlines, at sea, in remote regions, and by the military in Europe and the US. Lightweight, compact and robust enough to withstand being dropped from 2 m, it is an all-in-one unit, meaning medics have less equipment to carry.


All conventional instruments typically required for emergency monitoring and intensive care can be connected such as blood oxygen saturation and contact temperature sensors, invasive and non-invasive blood pressure equipment, electrocardiogram leads, a laryngoscope and a USB ultrasound probe. It includes a GPS chip and has wifi, Bluetooth and ethernet connectivity, and can exchange voice, video and medical data.


“We are very pleased to see Tempus Pro used at an astronaut landing. This is a very demanding situation and proves the performance of this product,” added Arnaud.


The company is now developing Tempus ALS for ambulances and intensive care units, which can record data in a secured cloud via satellite communication as well as on the device, and plans new features such as a defibrillator.


Related links:


Tempus ALS: https://business.esa.int/projects/jackson-amazon-ccn1-temp


Remote Diagnostic Technologies: http://www.rdtltd.com/


European Astronaut Centre (EAC): http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Astronauts/The_European_Astronaut_Centre


Space for Health: http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Preparing_for_the_Future/Space_for_Earth/Space_for_health


Amazon project page: http://artes-apps.esa.int/projects/amazon


Business Applications homepage: https://business.esa.int/


Images, Text, Credit: European Space Agency (ESA).


Best regards, Orbiter.ch


met-islamic-art: Finial with Arabic Inscription”Ya,…

met-islamic-art: Finial with Arabic Inscription”Ya,…


met-islamic-art:



Finial with Arabic Inscription”Ya, Da’im” (“Oh, Everlasting!”), Islamic Art


Medium: Steel; inlaid with gold on front and silver foil overlay on reverse


Gift of Nasser D. Khalili, in honor of his son, Daniel Jonathan Khalili, 1982

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/453162



Plate Eight from Nouveavx Desseins D’Arquebvseries by Gilles Demarteau

Plate Eight from Nouveavx Desseins D’Arquebvseries by Gilles Demarteau

Plate Eight from Nouveavx Desseins D’Arquebvseries by Gilles Demarteau


met-american-painting: Sketch of Saint Gaudens’s Statue of…

met-american-painting: Sketch of Saint Gaudens’s Statue of…


met-american-painting:



Sketch of Saint Gaudens’s Statue of Deacon Samuel Chapin, Springfield, Massachusetts by Stanford White, American Paintings and Sculpture


Medium: Pastel, charcoal, and pencil on paper


Morris K. Jesup Fund, 1999

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/16587



В музее археологии и этнографии Челябинского...

В музее археологии и этнографии Челябинского...


В музее археологии и этнографии Челябинского государственного университета в среду, 27 сентября, открылась выставка «От Петровки до Степного: 40 лет археологической экспедиции ЧелГУ».
Более ста артефактов, найденных археологами в раскопках последних лет, представили в стенах музея. В конце 70-х годов прошлого века состоялись первые экспедиции южноуральских археологов. В то же время и появился музей в ЧелГУ. У истоков этого движения стоял известный археолог, инициатор создания музея «Аркаим» Геннадий Зданович.
«Когда говорят о жизненном пути – нужно говорить о будущем, но 40 лет экспедиций заставляют сказать и о прошлом. До 70-х годов в Челябинске не было как таковой археологии: были кружки, работали краеведы или приехавшие археологи. Сейчас челябинские археологи раскапывают памятники, которые становится знаковыми. Археология выносит имя университета и Челябинской области на международный уровень», – отметил Геннадий Зданович на торжественном открытии выставки.
В экспозиции представлены предметы различных памятников Южного Урала от каменного века до Средневековья. Гости выставки могут увидеть здесь наконечники стрел, керамические сосуды и зооморфные скульптуры, предметы конского снаряжения, ножи, украшения из бронзы и золота и даже косметические наборы.
По словам научного сотрудника Заповедника «Аркаим» и хранителя фондов музея ЧелГУ Надежды Малой, почти все артефакты, представленные на временной выставке, ранее нигде не демонстрировались.
Экспозиция «От Петровки до Степного: 40 лет археологической экспедиции ЧелГУ» будет находиться в музее ЧелГУ до 9 сентября, после этого экспонаты можно будет увидеть в Челябинском краеведческом музее.
Источник
Урал-Пресс-Информ
Мария Белова http://uralpress.ru/


Database of earthquakes triggered by human activity is…

Database of earthquakes triggered by human activity is…


Database of earthquakes triggered by human activity is growing—with some surprises http://www.geologypage.com/2017/09/database-earthquakes-triggered-human-activity-growing-surprises.html


Study Confirms Large Earthquakes along Olympic Mountain Faults…

Study Confirms Large Earthquakes along Olympic Mountain Faults…


Study Confirms Large Earthquakes along Olympic Mountain Faults http://www.geologypage.com/2017/09/study-confirms-large-earthquakes-along-olympic-mountain-faults.html


Researcher unearths hottest rock on record…

Researcher unearths hottest rock on record…


Researcher unearths hottest rock on record http://www.geologypage.com/2017/09/researcher-unearths-hottest-rock-record.html


met-european-sculpture: Journey of a Soul to Heaven by Franz…

met-european-sculpture: Journey of a Soul to Heaven by Franz…


met-european-sculpture:



Journey of a Soul to Heaven by Franz Konrad Linck, European Sculpture and Decorative Arts


Medium: Hard-paste porcelain


Gift of R. Thornton Wilson, in memory of Florence Ellsworth Wilson, 1945

Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, NY


http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/199662



Северное сияние над провинцией Альберта, Канада.Ночь на 27...

Северное сияние над провинцией Альберта, Канада.Ночь на 27...











Северное сияние над провинцией Альберта, Канада.
Ночь на 27 сентября 2017.


© 2017 Justin Wondga


Удар молнии в дерево…

Удар молнии в дерево…











Удар молнии в дерево


cloudair:Logarithmic spirals in nature

cloudair:Logarithmic spirals in nature





cloudair:



Logarithmic spirals in nature



Landslide in ColoradoLarge amounts of water don’t just produce…

Landslide in ColoradoLarge amounts of water don’t just produce…


Landslide in Colorado


Large amounts of water don’t just produce flooding; increasing water pressures also tends to destabilize loose or fractured rocks on slopes. When water enters pore spaces within rocks, it exerts a pressure that works against any force holding the rock together. Adding enough water can weaken rocks or sediments to the point where they give way, causing a mudslide, as happened here.


This slide barely avoided a ranch at the lower right edge of this image.


-JBB


Image credit: Colorado Geological Survey
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=673957155956330


Fossil rich limestone from near Chicago

Fossil rich limestone from near Chicago




Fossil rich limestone from near Chicago


Isotopic analyses link the lives of Late Neolithic individuals to burial location in Spain

Isotopic analyses link the lives of Late Neolithic individuals to burial location in Spain


An isotopic analysis of megalithic graves and caves in Spain may suggest the existence of a degree of differentiation in the lifeways of people buried in these different funerary sites, according to a study published in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Teresa Fernández-Crespo and Rick Schulting from the University of the Basque Country, Spain, and the University of Oxford, UK.











Isotopic analyses link the lives of Late Neolithic individuals to burial location in Spain
A megalithic graves analysed (Chabola de la Hechicera), and in the background, the Cantabria mountain range, 
where the caves included in the study are located [Credit: Teresa Fernández-Crespo/UPV/EHU]

Previous research on the burial practices of the Western European Neolithic has revealed variation in burial location and treatment, but their significance is difficult to interpret. To further investigate the meaning behind different burial practices within the same location and period, the authors of the present study analyzed the bone collagen carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements of 166 individuals from a series of broadly contemporary Late Neolithic (3500 to 2900 cal BC) mortuary monuments and caves, closely situated together in north-central Spain.


The researchers’ isotopic analysis of both megalithic graves and caves suggests a similar C3 plant-based human diet, mostly consisting of wheat and barley, as well as a substantial amount of protein from cattle and sheep. However, the study surprisingly reveals significant carbon isotope differences between people interred in both funerary site-types. These differences seem to be correlated with elevation, temperature, and precipitation, implying that land use was partitioned on a surprisingly local scale.


The authors propose two possible explanations. The first is that this division of land could indicate different socioeconomic classes within the same community, with the lower classes being interred in caves with restricted access to agricultural resources, while the individuals of higher status in the community were buried in monumental graves whose construction would involve a considerable investment of labor. Alternatively, they also consider the possibility that this partitioning of the landscape may involve different populations performing different funerary practices and following distinct subsistence economies in some respect.


Further research on tooth dentine and enamel will explore the age at which the isotopic differences first appeared and investigate different patterns of mobility and landscape-use in the study area. This study offers new insights into different mortuary practices and specifically how they related to lifeways, particularly dietary and subsistence practices, and implications for the emergence of socioeconomic inequality in the Western European Neolithic.


“Using carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis of human and animal remains, our study has identified meaningful differences between those buried in caves and megalithic graves in the Late Neolithic of north-central Spain,” says Teresa Fernández-Crespo. “This implies that, despite living in close proximity, these communities had distinct lifeways involving a partitioning of the landscape.”


Source: Public Library of Science [September 27, 2017]




TANN




Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan

Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan


Archaeologists examining plant impressions within broken pottery have discovered the earliest evidence for domesticated sorghum in Africa. The evidence comes from an archaeological site (known as KG23) in eastern Sudan, dating from 3500 to 3000 BC, and is associated with an ancient archaeological culture known as the Butana Group.











Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan
Sorghum bicolor [Credit: Flickr, Dinesh Valke]

Sorghum is a native African grass that was utilized for thousands of years by prehistoric peoples, and emerged as one of the world’s five most important cereal crops, along with rice, wheat, barley, and maize.


For a half century scholars have hypothesized that native African groups were domesticating sorghum outside the winter rainfall zone of the ancient Egyptian Nile Valley (where wheat and barley cereals were predominant) in the semi-arid tropics of Africa, but no archaeological evidence existed.











Earliest evidence for a native African cultigen discovered in Eastern Sudan
A comparison of Wild and Domesticated Sorghum [Credit: Dorian Q. Fuller]

This new discovery in eastern Sudan reveals that during the 4th millennium BC, peoples of the Butana Group were intensively cultivating wild stands of sorghum until they began to change the plant genetically into domesticated morphotypes.


Along with the recent discovery of domesticated pearl millet in eastern Mali around 2500 BC, this latest discovery in eastern Sudan pushes back the process for domesticating summer rainfall cereals another thousand years in the Sahel, with sorghum, providing new evidence for the earliest known native African cultigen


The findings are published in Current Anthropology.


Source: University of Chicago Press Journals [September 27, 2017]




TANN




Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests

Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests


A genomic analysis of ancient human remains from KwaZulu-Natal revealed that southern Africa has an important role to play in writing the history of humankind. A research team from Uppsala University, Sweden, the Universities of Johannesburg and the Witwatersrand, South Africa, presents their results in the journal Science.











Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests
The Florisbad skull [Credit: John Hawks]

The team sequenced the genomes of seven individuals who lived in southern Africa 2300-300 years ago. The three oldest individuals dating to 2300-1800 years ago were genetically related to the descendants of the southern Khoe-San groups, and the four younger individuals who lived 500-300 years ago were genetically related to current-day South African Bantu-speaking groups. “This illustrates the population replacement that occurred in southern Africa,” says co-first author Carina Schlebusch, population geneticist at Uppsala University.


The authors estimate the divergence among modern humans to have occurred between 350,000 and 260,000 years ago, based on the ancient Stone Age hunter-gatherer genomes. The deepest split time of 350,000 years ago represents a comparison between an ancient Stone Age hunter-gatherer boy from Ballito Bay on the east coast of South Africa and the West African Mandinka. “This means that modern humans emerged earlier than previously thought,” says Mattias Jakobsson, population geneticist at Uppsala University who headed the project together with Stone Age archaeologist Marlize Lombard at the University of Johannesburg.











Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests
Demographic model of African history and estimated divergences. Vertical colored lines represent migration, with 
down-pointing triangles representing admixture into another group. Southern African hunter-gatherers 
are shown by red symbols, and Iron Age farmers as green symbols [Credit: Uppsala University]

The fossil record of east Africa, and in particular the Omo and Herto fossils have often been used to set the emergence of anatomically modern humans to about 180,000 years ago. The deeper estimate for modern human divergence at 350,000-260,000 years ago coincides with the Florisbad and Hoedjiespunt fossils, contemporaries of the small-brained Homo naledi in southern Africa. “It now seems that at least two or three Homo species occupied the southern African landscape during this time period, which also represents the early phases of the Middle Stone Age,” says Marlize Lombard. It will be interesting to see in future if we find any evidence of interaction between these groups.


“We did not find any evidence of deep structure or archaic admixture among southern African Stone Age hunter-gatherers, instead, we see some evidence for deep structure in the West African population, but that affects only a small fraction of their genome and is about the same age as the deepest divergence among all humans,” says Mattias Jakobsson.











Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests
Dr. Helena Malmström conducting on-site sampling of bone matrial in a mobil sampling lab 
[Credit: Uppsala University]

The authors also found that all current-day Khoe-San populations admixed with migrant East African pastoralists a little over a thousand years ago. “We could not detect this widespread East African admixture previously since we did not have an un-admixed San group to use as reference. Now that we have access to ancient DNA of people who lived on the landscape before the East African migration, we are able to detect the admixture percentages in all San groups. The admixture percentages in the Khoekhoe, historically identified as pastoralists, are higher than previously estimated,” says Carina Schlebusch.


Of the Iron Age individuals, three carry at least one Duffy null allele, protecting against malaria, and two have at least one sleeping-sickness-resistance variant in the APOL1 gene. The Stone Age individuals do not carry these protective alleles. “This tells us that Iron Age farmers carried these disease-resistance variants when they migrated to southern Africa,” says co-first author Helena Malmström, archaeo-geneticist at Uppsala University.











Modern humans emerged more than 300,000 years ago new study suggests
Marlize Lombard (University of Johannesburg) excavating at Sibudu Cave (under the direction
 of Prof Lyn Wadley, University of the Witwatersrand), about 40 km southeast of Ballito Bay
 where the boy was found. The cave was intermittently occupied by humans from at least 
77,000 years ago who might have been ancestral to the Ballito boy 
[Credit: Lyn Wadley, University of the Witwatersrand]

Marlize Lombard said that “archaeological deposits dating to the time of the split by 350,000-260,000 years ago, attest to South Africa being populated by tool-making hunter-gatherers at the time. Although human fossils are sparse, those of Florisbad and Hoedjiespunt are seen as transitional to modern humans.” These fossils may therefore be ancestral to the Ballito Bay boy and other San hunter-gatherers who lived in southern Africa 2000 years ago.


The transition from archaic to modern humans might not have occurred in one place in Africa but in several, including southern Africa and northern Africa as recently reported. “Thus, both palaeo-anthropological and genetic evidence increasingly points to multiregional origins of anatomically modern humans in Africa, i.e. Homo sapiens did not originate in one place in Africa, but might have evolved from older forms in several places on the continent with gene flow between groups from different places,” says Carina Schlebusch.


“It is remarkable that we can now sequence entire genomes of ancient human remains from tropical areas, such as the southeast coast of South Africa,” says Helena Malmström. This is promising for our several ongoing investigations in Africa.


Cumulatively these findings shed new light on our species’ deep African history and show that there is still much more to learn about our process of becoming modern humans and that the interplay between genetics and archaeology has an increasingly important role to play.


Source: Uppsala University [September 28, 2017]




TANN




Meteor Activity Outlook for 30 September-6 October 2017

Meteor Activity Outlook for 30 September-6 October 2017
This incredible fireball was captured by Arvids Baranovs on September 25 at 21:09 UT from the raised bog of Ķemeri in Latvia. © Arvids Baranovs and Eaglewood Photography eaglewoodfilms.com

Meteor activity increases in October when compared to September. A major shower (the Orionids) is active all month long and there are also many minor showers to be seen. Both branches of the Taurids become more active as the month progresses, providing slow, graceful meteors to the nighttime scene. The Orionids are the big story of the month reaching maximum activity on the 22nd. This display can be seen equally well from both hemispheres which definitely helps out observers located in the sporadic-poor southern hemisphere this time of year. Sporadic activity is still good as seen from the northern hemisphere. In the southern hemisphere though, the sporadic activity is near its annual nadir.


During this period the moon will reach its full phase on Friday October 6th. At this time the moon will be located opposite the sun and will lie above the horizon all night long. This weekend the waxing gibbous moon will set during the early morning hours, allowing meteor observers a few hours of dark skies before the first light of dawn. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for those viewing from the northern hemisphere and 2 for those located south of the equator. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 16 as seen from mid-northern latitudes and 13 from the southern tropics. The actual rates will also depend on factors such as personal light and motion perception, local weather conditions, alertness and experience in watching meteor activity. Evening rates are reduced this week due to moonlight. Note that the hourly rates listed below are estimates as viewed from dark sky sites away from urban light sources. Observers viewing from urban areas will see less activity as only the brighter meteors will be visible from such locations.


The radiant (the area of the sky where meteors appear to shoot from) positions and rates listed below are exact for Saturday night/Sunday morning September 30/October 1. These positions do not change greatly day to day so the listed coordinates may be used during this entire period. Most star atlases (available at science stores and planetariums) will provide maps with grid lines of the celestial coordinates so that you may find out exactly where these positions are located in the sky. A planisphere or computer planetarium program is also useful in showing the sky at any time of night on any date of the year. Activity from each radiant is best seen when it is positioned highest in the sky, either due north or south along the meridian, depending on your latitude. It must be remembered that meteor activity is rarely seen at the radiant position. Rather they shoot outwards from the radiant so it is best to center your field of view so that the radiant lies at the edge and not the center. Viewing there will allow you to easily trace the path of each meteor back to the radiant (if it is a shower member) or in another direction if it is a sporadic. Meteor activity is not seen from radiants that are located far below the horizon. The positions below are listed in a west to east manner in order of right ascension (celestial longitude). The positions listed first are located further west therefore are accessible earlier in the night while those listed further down the list rise later in the night.





Radiant Positions at 9pm LDT


Radiant Positions at 21:00

Local Summer Time






Radiant Positions at 01:00 Local Daylight Saving Time


Radiant Positions at 01:00

Local Summer Time






Radiant Positions at 5am LDT


Radiant Positions at 5:00

Local Summer Time





These sources of meteoric activity are expected to be active this week.


.


Experienced observers are urged to be on the lookout for any activity from the October Capricornids (OCC). These meteors are possibly related to lost comet D/1978 R1 (Haneda-Campos). If the comet still exists it would have reached perihelion in November 2016. A moderate display of bright meteors was seen from Australia on October 3, 1972. Other attempts at observing these meteors were less successful. Moonlight will interfere during this period but observers are still urged to monitor the evening sky this week for any very slow meteors radiating from the border of Capricornus and Aquila near the position 20:12 (303) -10. This position is roughly 4 degrees northwest of the naked eye double star known as Algedi (alpha2 Capricorni). This position is best placed near 2000 local summer time (LST) when the radiant lies highest above the horizon. While this area of the sky is fairly well placed for northern observers, it is much more favorably placed for those south of the equator where it lies much higher in the sky. Like the Daytime Sextantids mentioned below, any observations of these stream (either positive or negative) would be important to our understanding of these streams. Maximum activity is predicted to occur on October 2nd.


The Southern Taurids (STA) are active from a large radiant centered near 01:20 (020) +06. This position lies in southeastern Pisces, 2 degrees southeast of the faint star known as zeta Piscium. These meteors may be seen all night long but the radiant is best placed near 0200 LST when it lies on the meridian and is located highest in the sky. Rates at this time should be near 3 per hour regardless of your location. With an entry velocity of 27 km/sec., the average Southern Taurid meteor would be of slow velocity.


The last of the September Epsilon Perseids (SPE) will be seen this week. The radiant is currently located at 04:49 (072) +41. This position lies on the Perseus/Auriga border, 3 degrees west of the 3rd magnitude star known as Haedus II (eta Aurigae). The radiant is best placed near 0500 LST, when it lies highest above the horizon. Rates are expected to be less than 1 per hour no matter your location. With an entry velocity of 65 km/sec., most activity from this radiant would be swift.


The Orionids (ORI) are active from a radiant located at 04:57 (074) +17, which places it in central Taurus, 4 degrees east of the 1st magnitude orange star known as Aldebaran (alpha Tauri). This area of the sky is best placed in the sky during the last hour before dawn, when it lies highest above the horizon in a dark sky. Current rates would be near 2 per hour no matter your location. With an entry velocity of 67 km/sec., most activity from this radiant would be of swift speed.


The nu Eridanids (NUE) were co-discovered by Japanese observers using SonotoCo and Juergen Rendtel and Sirko Molau of the IMO. Activity from this long-period stream stretches from August 24 all the way to November 16. A very shallow maximum occurred near September 8. The radiant currently lies at 05:35 (084) +08, which places it in western Orion, 3 degrees northeast of the 2nd magnitude star known as Bellatrix (gamma Orionis). This area of the sky is best seen during the last dark hour before dawn when the radiant lies highest in a dark sky. Current rates are expected to be near 1 per hour during this period no matter your location. With an entry velocity of 67 km/sec., the average meteor from this source would be of swift velocity. Some experts feel that these meteors are early members of the Orionid shower, which peaks on October 22.


The Daytime Sextantids (DSX) are not well known due to the fact that the radiant lies close to the sun and these meteors are only visible during the last couple of hours before dawn. The radiant is currently located at 10:24 (156) -02. This position lies in central Sextans, 4 degrees southeast of the 4th magnitude star known as alpha Sextantis. This area of the sky is best placed in the sky during the last hour before dawn, when it lies highest above the horizon in a dark sky. Current rates would be most likely less than 1 per hour no matter your location. Spotting any of this activity would be a notable accomplishment. With an entry velocity of 33km/sec., most activity from this radiant would be of medium-slow speed.


As seen from the mid-northern hemisphere (45N) one would expect to see approximately 10 sporadic meteors per hour during the last hour before dawn as seen from rural observing sites. Evening rates would be near 2 per hour. As seen from the tropical southern latitudes (25S), morning rates would be near 7 per hour as seen from rural observing sites and 1 per hour during the evening hours. Locations between these two extremes would see activity between the listed figures. Evening rates are reduced this week due to moonlight.


The list below offers the information from above in tabular form. Rates and positions are exact for Saturday night/Sunday morning except where noted in the shower descriptions.













































































SHOWER DATE OF MAXIMUM ACTIVITY CELESTIAL POSITION ENTRY VELOCITY CULMINATION HOURLY RATE CLASS
RA (RA in Deg.) DEC Km/Sec Local Summer Time North-South
October Capricornids (OCC) Oct 02 20:12 (303) -10 10 20:00 <1 – <1 IV
Southern Taurids (STA) Oct 29-Nov 03 01:20 (020) +06 27 02:00 3 – 3 II
September Epsilon Perseids (SPE) Sep 10 04:49 (072) +41 65 05:00 <1 – <1 II
Orionids (ORI) Oct 22 04:57 (074) +17 67 05:00 2 – 2 I
nu Eridanids (NUE) Sep 08 05:35 (084) +08 67 06:00 1 – 1 IV
Daytime Sextantids (DSX) Sep 29 10:24 (156) -02 33 11:00 <1 – <1 IV

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